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Six Mile Jog-Walk Body Weighted Runs Performance & Comments Table
August 7 2009 -- present
 
This prologue to tables:
Version 1 8/7/2009
Version 2 10/5/2009
Version 3 11/24/09
Runs data in table 2 generally kept up to date
 
Related Link: Soccer Football Futsal Basketball Baseball Tennis Training Log Page Fourteen (http://www.angelfire.com/ma/vincemoon/soccairfourteen.htm)
 
Previously I reported on my blog (http://davidvirgil.blogspot.com/), my times for a round the block course in which two times around the block were considered to be one mile. My estimate is that 'one mile' on this round the block course, is actually equal to 0.9 miles. All the runs listed here, unless otherwise noted, are on a scientifically laid out and measured oval track, on which one lap is exactly equal to 0.25 miles.
 
Body-weight poundages used in this table, are based on ideas set forth in my page "Ideal proportional weights for wrist, ankle, thigh and vest in sports training" (http://coolname001.angelfire.com/bodyweightproportions.htm).
 
A general idea has been that there are two types of runners that are able to accomplish feats such as running two miles in twelve minutes (the consensus opinion is that roughly speaking top soccer players should be able to run two miles in twelve minutes. One type is compared to the other type, relatively light, thin, weak, and relies on his aerobic capacity; reigning mile world record holder El-Guerrouj, at approx six feet but only 135 lbs is of this type. The other type is relatively heavy, stocky, strong, and relies on muscular strength; explosive male sprinters about six feet tall and 180 lbs are of this type. The idea has been that the heavier stronger type will succeed better in sports such as baseball, football, soccer, basketball and tennis. The running in body-weights is designed to produce the heavier stronger type as opposed to the lighter type who depends on 'wind', aerobic power.
 
There has been one study I know of that found positive results in terms of vertical jump ability improvement, for those who wore weighted weight-vests in the course of their daily lives. There have been some fears expressed regarding ankle-weights, but I have never used more than 1 lb, which is 16 oz, on an ankle while doing these weighted runs. I once had a dream that these adjustable ankle-weights I bought years ago were made of gold.
 
The latest data in terms of exercise effects on health indicates that especially for persons who are at least of middle-age, an exercise regimen that includes weightlifting is superior to one that includes only aerobic exercise such as jogging. The six miles in weights combines the two types of exercise.  
 
A factor influencing the choice of jog/walks in weights as an exercise routine was that this kind of exercise, especially involving the use of thigh-weights, has been experimented with little if at all; thus this experiment adds something new to the knowledge base.
 
It is reasonable to suppose that individuals vary in terms of the level of exercise that is optimum for them. It is reasonable to suppose that for a given individual the optimum exercise level varies. The six-miles in body-weights is an exercise routine that would fit for those who need to expend large amounts of energy when exercising.
 
The first setting for the body-weights that was common when I started the workouts described in table 2 (below) was:
 
Setting S1: Each wrist, 0.25 lbs; each ankle, 0.50 lbs; each thigh, 1.0 lbs; weight-vest: 6 lbs. This was based on the belief that 5 lbs on the weight vest is correctly proportional to 0.50 lbs on each ankle. However since if I was to wear 5 lbs in the weight-vest, the weight would be unbalanced with more weight on either the left or right side of the weight vest, I wore 6 lbs in the weight vest because 6 lbs, being divisible by two, can be distributed evenly in the weight-vest so as to avoid more weight being on either the left or right side of the weight-vest. This is the minimum poundage setting if the laws of proportion are to be achieved, because 0.25 lbs is the minimum weight for the wrist-weights.
 
Starting August 16th, I switched to a body-weights setting of: Setting S2: Each wrist, 0.50 lbs; each ankle, 1.0 lbs; each thigh, 2.0 lbs; weight-vest: 0 lbs. The main reason for the switch was that the weight-vest was unbearably hot during the hot August days and nights.
 
October 5th, I decided to here review the body-weights settings problem. It is a problem and problems are annoying however the suspicicion remains that miraculous achievements could be attained through extreme cleverness regarding the body-weights settings. That does not mean that I feel like expending time, mental energy, or physical energy  studying the matter.
 
Heretofore not implemented possible body-weights settings of note:
 
Setting S3: Each wrist, 0.50 lbs; each ankle, 1.0 lbs; each thigh, 2.0 lbs; weight-vest: 10 lbs. The proper weight-vest poundage is 10 lbs if the ankle-poundage is 1 lbs each ankle, according to the proportional canons I worked out. Since 10 lbs is divisible by two the ten pounds weight can be evenly distributed in the weight vest allowing for balance and does not have to be adjusted from what the canons prescribe. This settings maintains the S2 setting but adds 10 lbs in the weight-vest.
 
Setting S4: Each wrist, 0 lbs; each ankle, 0 lbs; each thigh, 0 lbs; weight-vest: 6 lbs. This uses only weight-vest poundage, the weight-vest poundage being the same as what is proportionally correct and also balanced when the weights are at the minimum wherein proportion is achieved, which is the S1 setting, each wrist 0.25 lbs, each ankle 0.5 lbs, each thigh 1.0 lbs, weight-vest 6.0 lbs.
 
Setting S5: Each wrist, 0 lbs; each ankle, 0 lbs; each thigh, 0 lbs; weight-vest: 10 lbs. This utilizes nothing but weight-vest poundage, the weight-vest poundage set at the poundage used in Setting S3.
 
In summary settings already used and under consideration are:
 
Table 1 Body-weights settings for Six Mile Runs
(the table described in the title of the page is table 2 further down)
 









Setting
Each
wrist
lbs
Each
ankle
lbs
Each
thigh
lbs
Weight
vest
lbs


  S1 0.25 0.50 1.0 06  used  
  S2 0.50 1.0 2.0 00  used  
  S3 0.50 1.0 2.0 10    
  S4 0 0 0 06    
  S5 0 0 0 10    
                
               
 
 
The theory of this in part is that the training with the a given level of weights strengthens the body so as to enable it to accomplish more when it is not wearing the weights. Thus training with a second level of weights different from the first level of weights could be said to strengthen the body's ability to train with the  first set of weights.
 
When I studied the kinds of training used to improve sprint speed and jumping ability, a trend I noted in the data was that mixed approaches, utilizing a combination of different training techniques, seem to work better than just one approach alone.
 
A limitation I face is that the six-miles in weights is tiring; the fatigue produced impairs performance in other areas of life. Therefore I hesitate to increase the weights beyond the S2 level. I feel inclined to stick with the S2 settings until I am the point where the fatigue that impairs life aside from sports disappears.
 
Table 2 Six mile Jog-walk Body-weighted Runs Results & Comments Table
R=mile run; W=mile walked; NC='nutrients cocktail' consumed before start of run
break time for various reasons, such as tying shoes and tightening thigh-weights, ignored if less than 5 minutes for timed workouts
Usual break time during runs 10-15 minutes for readjusting weights, tying shoes, etc.
 
















Date
Start
Time
Miles
Run/
Walked
(listed in
order
executed)
Time
after
5
miles
(unless
noted)
Time
(mins)
per
mile
Wrist 
wts
per
ankle
lbs
Ankle 
wts
per
thigh
lbs
Thigh
wts
per
thigh
lbs
Weight
Vest
Wt
lbs
Comm
ents






8/7/09
8-9 PM
RWRWRW
96:50
19.4
0
0
0
0







8/8
8-9 PM
RWRWRW
99:55
20.0
0
1/4
1/2
06
NC






8/9
10 PM
RWRWRW
103:52
20.8
1/4
1/4
1/2
06
NC






8/10
9 PM
RWRWRW
103:00
20.6
1/4
1/4
1/2
06
NC






8/12
2:30 PM
RWRWRW
116:50
23.4
1/4
1/4
1/2
06
1st
afternoon
run






8/13
405 PM
RWR
58:20
(after
3 miles)
19.4
0
1/4
1/2
06







8/14
440 PM
RWR
60:25
(after 3
miles)
20.1
1/4
1/4
1/2
06
hot, sunny
temp 85 F, humidity
55%
wind 2 mph
apparent temp 89 F.






8/14
940 PM
WRW
38:55
(after 2
miles)
19.5
1/4
1/4
1/2
06







8/15
700 PM
RWRWRW
96:53
19.4
1/4
1/4
1/2
06
sharp pain in
left big toe during
last half-mile run,
slowed time by
1-2 mins.
80 F, wind 5 mph,
humidity 68%
apparent temp
apparent temp 85






8/17
715 PM
RWRWRW
95:57
19.2
1/4
1/2
1.0
00
comfortable
not hot
good painless
run
wrist, thigh wts increased
no weight-vest






8/18
840 PM
RWRWRW
102:32
(not including
6:35, 6 mins 35 secs
in breaks)
20.5 1/2 1.0
2.0
 
thigh weights slipped and had to be
re-emplaced and re-tightened  twice,
at beginning of first mile, and end of
third mile
00







8/19
835 PM
RWRWRW
96:34
(not including
7:05 in
breaks)
19.3
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
thigh weights tightened twice, did not slip off
00
faster than
12 days ago
without body-
weights
 
At this rate I'll be at 6 mins per mile over 5 miles, while wearing heavy weights, in just 19 days.






8/20
10 PM
RWRWRW
94:47
(not including
8:30 in
breaks)

19.0
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
thigh weights tightened three times, did not slip off

00

At the rate of progress comparing 19.3 yesterday to 19.0 today, I'll be running 5 miles in 30 minutes while heavily weighted in a couple
of months.






8/22
420 AM
RWRWRW
94:43
(not incl
5.5 mins
breaks)
18.9
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
tightened thrice

00
first run of this series featuring caffeine consumed in 24 hrs prior to run






8/23
411 AM
RWRWRW
94:36
(not incl
breaks: 2 min tighten
thighweights;
15 min bathroom;
2 min thighweight
tightening)
18.9
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
tightened twice

00
NC+ BLT sandwich
before run led to
solid waste
disposal problem
after 2.75 miles
 
Did not pig-out on high protein foods after workout prior to this workout






8/24
400 AM
RWRWRW
94:20
 
(not incl 12 mins in breaks: tighten thighweights 2 min; tighten thighweights 3 min; bathroom break 4 min; tighten thighweights 3 min.)

18.9
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
Progress now seems slow, last 3 days, 15 seconds per day.
 
Nevertheless, at this 1 min every 4 days rate of progress, if the percentage decline in time stays constant per day, in just I guess, about 250 days I will be at 10 minutes per mile in heavy weights, putting me in position to get in the top 10 in my age group in the US for 10000 meters type stuff.







8/25
350 AM
RWRWRW
90:10
 
(not incl 11 min  breaks: 4 mins, 1 mins, 2 mins, 3 mins, 1 mins)
18.0
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
thighweights tighened 5 times over 5 miles, slipped below left knee twice, white-taped thighweight on left, red taped thighweight on right.
00
Finally broke out of stalemate.
 
In past 4 practices, time has decreased to a level 94.7% of what it was 4 practices ago.
 
 At this rate of improvement (from 19 mins per mile 4 workouts ago to 18 mins per mile today), while wearing heavy weights as worn today over five miles: in 60 days I will be running at the speed the man ranked #10 in the US in my age group runs over 5 miles; in 84 days I will be running at a six min per mile pace; in 100 days I will be running at a 5 min per mile pace.
 
24 hours prior to workout all I had was coffee w cream and sugar, and $5 worth of Brazilian beef sautee and Brazilian brown rice with hamburger from Whole Foods Hot bar approx 10 hours before beginning practice.
 
Since the Aug 20 workout, seems I have been lying in bed alot recuperating but sleeping only about 3 hours per 24 hour cycle. But I napped for about 1.5 hours prior to today's workout.
 
This was the first workout since the beginning of this project August 7, during which I felt I could call the weather 'cool'.  The temp was 66 degrees at the start of the workout, 64 at the end, 91% humidity.






8/27
approx
420 AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
did not have to be  tightened once over 6 miles. Possible reasons: washed in laundry detergent & cool water, air dried, day before; and, when first put on thigh, put on thigh at vertically lower level than usual, so tighter to begin with.
00
Began to feel I was falling into the trap of avoiding the workout due to danger of being slower than on previous day. Thus did not time this time. As it turned out, the fast 8/25 run seems to have tired me so the run and walked miles were it seemed slower today.






8/28
approx
500 AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
 
slight pain in left shoulder
during run (I am left handed, run track counter-
clockwise
live everyone else
1.0
2.0
 
Tightened twice over 6 miles. Initially tightened at vertically low point on thigh.

00
Energy level in general and especially  for the walked miles better than yesterday, not yet at normal level such as on 8/25.
 
Cupcakes approx 6 hours before run, and/or tangerine juice approx 1 hour before run, caused solid waste disposal pressure







8/29
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
Drizzling rain during run. Energy level returning to normal level of 8/25, but hard to tell because had to wear overly warm heavy jacket due to rain, had no windbreaker available.
 
Fatigue level after run was less than at any time wearing this level of weights.
 
Had three scrambled eggs cooked in red palm oil, before run.






8/31
 
approx
745 AM

RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn at vertically high level, bottom of weight 8.5" above top of knee. Left thigh weight slipped off twice, thighweights tightened five times

00
Seemed to be more energy on run miles and less on walked miles compared to Aug 25.
 
Some pain in outside of knees second half of last mile. Seems this due to constricting effect of thighweights worn at vertically high level.
 
From August 17 or earlier to August 29, slept only about 3 hours per 24 hour cycle,  in bed alot without sleeping;as if runs in heavyweights tired my body while radically waking up my mind. Then finally after Aug 29 run and on Aug 30, had normal amount of sleep. Aug 29 sleep excellent, about 8 hours uninterrupted sleep.






9/1
approx
645 AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
tightened low, bottom of thighweight approx 2.5" above top of knee; tightened twice; did not slip down once

00
Again,
Seemed to be more energy on run miles and less on walked miles compared to Aug 25.
 
Last 440 yd lap of fifth mile was run using approx the usual number paces (83 six pace cycles, 498 paces); but number paces per minute much faster than ever before running this run using these weights






9/2
approx
1150 AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
tightened medium height, bottom of thighweight approx 5.5" above top of knee; tightened thrice; did not slip down once
00
More energy on run miles compared to walked miles.
 
Agonizing pain in left toe last 440 yds lap of third mile which was run, but I kept going, running the whole lap anyway. Pain was cured by removing shoe, loosening shoelaces in front of shoe, putting shoe on again. Yet again a very simple inexpensive solution works.
 
Last 440 yds of first mile, only 77.5 six pace cycles (465 paces). Up till today the usual has been 84 six-pace cycles (504 paces), and it has never been less than 82 six-pace cycles (492 paces). Thus today 16 days after starting runs at the weights used today, the number paces used to complete a 440 yd lap is down by 8%! This is good news especially combined with the fast rate of paces per minute evinced yesterday. I count the paces on the last lap of the run miles.
 
At this rate of reduction of number of paces used per 440 yd lap, in just 4 months the paces will average six feet in length, in heavy weights as worn today. World record holder in mile El-Guerrouj covered 7.2 feet per pace, without wearing weights.
 
Warm and very sunny, completely cloudless today. 80 degrees, 38% humidity.






9/5
approx
900
AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn high on thigh; tightened twice during run; did not slip off.

00
The 9/2 practice resulted in severe sunburn.
 
Insomnia returned over the past three nights.
 
4th lap of first run mile, 77.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 83 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 76.5 six-pace cycles (1.3% reduction compared to previous run).
 
Warm and sunny outside.






9/6
approx
1100 AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0.5
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn low on thigh. Tightened twice during run, did not slip off.

00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 78 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 81.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 78 six-pace cycles






9/7
approx
800 AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0.5
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn at mid-thigh; tightened once only, after first quarter-mile

00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 76 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 77.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 73.5 six-pace cycles.
 
I estimate that in wts my pace-length is 80% of what it is without weights.
 
Thus, in weights I estimate I should get to a pace length 80% of the El-Guerrouj mile world record pace length of 7'2". That would be a pace-length of 69 inches, which would be 38 six-pace cycles over 440 yds.
 
Sept 2 the best performance in pace length was 77.5 six-pace cycles over 440 yds; today Sept 7 the best pace-length segment was 73.5 six-pace cycles over 440 yds.
 
At the rate of improvement from Sept 2 to Sept 7, if this percentage rate of improvement 5%) per five days continues in the future, I will be down to 38 six-pace cycles over 440 yds in just 65 days.
 
I know that I already possess the ability to move my legs very quickly, I can sprint very fast for someone having legs of my length. What I feel I need to focus on is the increase in pace-length.
 
By pace I mean one step. People who say a pace is two steps are weirdos in my book.
 
Funny that yesterday my best pace-length performance over 440 yds was 78 paces, today it was 73.5 paces, and all I had to eat between yesterday's workout and todays workout, was fruit juice, coffee creamer, half n half, and mixed nuts.
 
Today before practice I replaced the milk/half n half dairy creamer in the coffee with coconut milk.
 
Yesterday I again experienced the physical exhaustion of being in bed either asleep or awake for most of the time intervening between yestrday's workout and today's workout.
 
The second half of the first mile was pleasurable, felt like running along a stream in some pure and idyllic land. For the first time I enjoyed this long distance running in weights at this time.






9/8
Approx 515 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn high on thigh, tightened twice.

00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 85 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 80.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 77 six-pace cycles.
 
The fourth lap of the first mile was a huge step backwards. Possible culprits: ran out of my supply of mixed nuts yesterday; ran about 12 hours after waking up; warm weather during first run mile; felt so tired this morning procrastinated run till evening; had about four pieces of toast with butter sometimes jam also before run.
 
However the 77 paces in the last 440 yd lap of the last mile, would have been a new personal best six days ago.
 
I may not be turning into a world record speed mile runner overnight, but I noticed something in the mirror this afternoon, when I saw myself in a tight white t-shirt made out of thin material. I have developed that lean non-fat athletic look in the upper body from doing these weighted runs. The look combines the lean muscularity one sees in the 'noble savages' such as isolated jungle tribes, with the civilized look one finds in peoples who have been highly civilized for long periods of time.
 
I've now run using this weight setup seventeen times during the 22 days since August 18, for a total of 102 miles.
 
Earlier during the ten days from august 8 to aug 17 I ran in weights nine times for a total of 45 miles, mostly with lighter limb weights combined with six pounds in the weight vest.
 
The mile figures are total combining miles walked and miles run. 






9/13
approx
1230 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn low,  about 3.5 inches above top of knee, tightened once

00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 76 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 79.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 75 six-pace cycles.
 
I thought I had only missed four days before this practice, actually I had missed three.
 
The four days of not working out, produced compared to 9/7, a day on which I ran for the third straight day, the same performance on the 4th lap of the first mile, but worse performance on the 4th laps of the third and fifth miles in terms of paces used to complete the 440 yd lap. However, 9/7 thighweights were worn at mid level elevation on thigh, whereas today 9/13 they were worn at  a low level on thigh.
 
9/7 was run 800 AM, this was run 1230 PM, the weather was warm and sometimes sunny and sometimes cloudy today.
 
Both 9/7 and today had coffee creamer and sugar before run, but had more coffee, approx 36 oz before 9/7 run, approx 24 oz before today's run. Had coconut milk for creamer before 9/7 run, but organic half n half for creamer before today's run.






9/14
approx
100 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn with bottom edge six inches above top of knee, very little slippage, reset once. Thighweights worn at medium elevation on thigh.

00
Had insomnia night before workout, only approx 4 hrs sleep.
 
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 77 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces.
 
changed from inhale for 3, exhale for 3 used up till now on these runs, to inhale for two paces, exhale for two paces: 
 
4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 119 four-pace cycles (translates to 79.5 six-pace cycles); 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 115 four-pace cycles  (translates to 76.5 six-pace cycles).
 
Warm and mostly sunny today.
 
Had coconut milk instead of dairy creamer in coffee prior to run.






9/15
approx
230 PM
RWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 75.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 76.5 six-pace cycles.
 
Both these counts are personal records, the first for the last 440 yds of the first mile run, the second for the last 440 yds of the second mile that is run.
 
Thus it appears that what my mind/body is doing is improvement in terms of the average length of a pace during the three miles run; apparently this is what precedes a new personal record in terms of number of paces used in one 440 yd lap.
 
The 73.5 six-pace cycles run on Sept 7 was for the fourth lap of the third mile run.
 
After the fourth mile was walked I had to stop because on the field inside the track, there was a Waltham HS Girl's Soccer Game going on.
 
The self-identified Waltham "athletics director" explained to me that the track could not be used because of fears of being sued if a little old lady got hit with a soccer ball etc.
 
I guess this man was William Foley (http://www.walthampublicschools.org/ath.cfm).
 
Warm mostly sunny during this run.
 
Beginning to feel springy bouncy energetic during workout. Beginning to enjoy workouts.
 






9/15
approx
840 PM
RW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
Last lap of run mile, third run mile of day, required 77.0 six-pace cycles to complete.
 
This run was different in that the fifth mile of the day, the third run mile of the day, was isolated from the other run and walked miles and the run took place late in the evening.






9/16
approx
315 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights at low elevation on thigh, bottom of thighweights approx 4" above top of knee.

00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 76 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 78 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 75.5 six-pace cycles.
 
Less fatigue during first five miles and especially during sixth mile compared to what has been usual.
 
Cool and mostly cloudy outside.
 
Lawnmower-man told me more than a half hour of sun is not good for me.
 
My reaction: it is the usual error to consider the negative effects of more than half an hour of sun per day, while ignoring the positive effects of such.






9/17
approx 400 PM
 
The track run could not be done because the track was closed because there was a Waltham HS Girl's soccer game, Waltham HS playing Acton-Boxborough.
 
Earlier the 'Athletic Director' told me the original cause of this was that a senior citizen got hit with a Lacrosse ball, when there was a Lacrosse game on the field the track surrounds. He also noted that General Electric was sued by some woman who used a stove as a stool to stand on to reach something and fell; the woman won the lawsuit. Hence, we are not allowed to use the track that surrounds the field when a feared Waltham HS Girls Soccer game is in progress, lest the Waltham schools get sued if a soccer ball collides with a senior citizen.
 
Guess what the balls they use, for legal purposes, seem to be kept soft at way below reasonable regulation level hardness, this would completely throw off my air-dribble game.
 
What is the point of a rulebook declaring that a soccer ball should be at a certain level of pounds per square inch inflation pressure, is such rules are not adhered to? How then can there be intelligent talented skilled preparation for a game during practices?
 
The scorekeeper at this Waltham vs Acton-Boxborough game, who reminded me of a rock-jawed, square-jawed, earnestly feminist (to the point of indignation), pink-skinned Episcopalian brother of  the James Bond actor Roger Moore, declared that the track was off limits till 530 PM. Unlike the Athletics Director he seemed to fail to realize the absurdity of the situation. He reminded me of the Episcopalian priestess, who, when I mentioned discimination against the male gender, instantaneously reflexively retorted, 'women have been discriminated against for thousands of years' (to which I instantaneously retorted, 'women have sons and fathers and husbands and brothers' or something like that. He reminded me of Episcopalians who insist that an employer does nothing wrong be restricting certain jobs to the female gender. Personally I am convinced that there are males who would make superior receptionists.
 
Fact is, that at any given time, not just when the dreaded Waltham Girls Soccer team is playing with an underinflated ball, there is the possibility that someone at the track could do something that could injure someone. Does that mean that the track should always be closed?
 
Personally I am highly offended by the idea that for purposes of legal self-defense, the high school soccer team would play with an underinflated ball. What an insult to and violation of, those whose play is based on a refined level of skill that is upset when the ball is inflated to a level that is way below what is regulation level hardness according to the rules of the game.
 
An NFHS ball at minimum should be inflated to 9-10 PSI (http://www.soccer.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merchant_Id=1&N=599+647&Product_Id=86565) (http://www.redrhinosports.com/Shop/Control/Product/fp/vpid/2699717/vpcsid/0/SFV/31974). It should not be a pillow like the girls soccer ball I handled the other day, which was definitely at below 7 PSI.
 
An underinflated ball is a great way to make a talented skilled spirited intelligent player look bad.
 
Seems as if the lawyers judges and juries have no common sense. If someone ventures on to a track when an activity that poses a potentially dangerous threat to certain vulnerable individuals such as them is in progress, they should be responsible for the decisions that they make such as taking the risk of being hit by a soccer ball. Next time some fool jumps in a lion's den at the zoo and gets eaten up, should the zoo have to pay the fool's family?

9/17
approx
615 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights at medium height, bottom approx six inches above top of knee, did not stop to fasten them once, they were like glued to my thighs.

00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 76 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 79 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 76.5 six-pace cycles. Fourth 440 yd lap of sixth mile, 78 six-pace cycles.
 
For the first time since starting to run using this level of body weights, every mile, both the run miles and the walked miles up to and including the fifth mile, were done at a brisk pace. For the first time since starting to run using this level of body weights, all the miles including the sixth mile were done at a brisk pace. The entire run there were no breaks to stop and tie shoes tighten thighweights take notes etc. There were three breaks, to piss after each mile that was run the first third and fifth miles.
 
Looks like the endurance level is starting to pick up at this time, as opposed to dramatic improvements in terms of the length of the average stride over a 440 yd lap.
 
Had a funny dream last night partially related to this:
 
About twelve kidnappers had kidnapped twelve persons, and I was one of the kidnapped persons. The kidnappers took one of the kidnapped persons, Richard Fozzard, who I went to grade school and high school with, and who was a friend of my boyhood friend Steve Massaquoi, and tortured him in the bathroom while I listened in the living room. Richard Screamed horribly for a long time as he was tortured. Then later I Richard with a kidnapper and he looked normal, well dressed, undisturbed, as if he had not been physically damaged. I saw myself pissing in a toilet, not moving as I pissed. Somehow this lack of movement as I pissed was related to the plateau I have lately been going through in terms of improvement in length of stride. Then I developed the ability to run long distances at a fast speed cross country trail run style, and escaped from the kidnappers. I did things I learned in places like summer camp, some kind of figure eight knot with a rope  I tied in the middle of the river, and escaped from the kidnappers.
 







9/18
Approx
300 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn high on thigh, tightened twice in first lap, felt magically attached after first two tightenings.

00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 78.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 80 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 76 six-pace cycles. Third and fourth 440 yd laps of sixth mile, 165 six-pace cycles.
 
The sixth mile was walked briskly, this has only started happening since yesterday. The sixth mile was walked with alot of arm movement, and with the balls of the feet and the heel hitting the ground simultaneously, as opposed to the heel hitting the ground first. Such is natural and comfortable after the strain on the feet caused by the running.
 
On every lap I came within 10 yards of the Waltham High School varsity football team practice. They held the practice right near the fence surrounding the track in a small area. Seemed like none of the team was taller than me. The groundskeeper told me that Waltham high school varsity football does not have big guys. He said tomorrow at 700 PM they play Xaverian, which he said, is the best team in the state and is going to 'kill' Waltham HS. He said that Paul Mayberry the Waltham HS football coach was 'great coach'.
 
A while back I emailed coach Mayberry an email containing stuff like some poetic prayers I had written, the email address used was the athletic director Foley's, best I can recall.
 
You can see the email I sent Coach Mayberry in October 2008 at:
 
http://coolname001.angelfire.com/mayberryemail.htm
 
There were segments during the run when it literally felt good to have the feet hit the ground. This is a far cry from the old days when the feet hitting the ground was painful.






9/19
approx
245 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights low on thigh, problem with abrasions caused by bottom of thighweight resting on top of kneecap

00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 77.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 78.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 75.5 six-pace cycles.
 
Not an especially energetic workout.
 
The Waltham athletic director, the groundskeepers, the Xaverian HS football team, the Xaverian coaches and fans, began occupying the parking lot, the stands and the field as I ended the workout. The athletic director, I guess he's Mr. Foley, asked me how the walking was going. I felt insulted. I run or jog half the miles I run, albeit at a slow pace.
 
Xaverian is supposedly the best team in the state right now. The athletic director told me this is the second year in a row they have played Waltham HS.
 
Xaverian is interesting to look at: Strong looking white black haired guys (they remind you of the description of King Solomon son of King David in the Bible), athletic looking white brown-haired guys, a good-looking team IMHO (I am not a female). The scientific poll of 10,000 randomly selected US females actually found that the most popular type with the opposite sex is males who are 5' 10", 175 lbs, wavy black hair, olive skin, blue eyes (which is me except for the blue eyes). Thes Xaverian guys who impressed me are stockier than 5' 10" 175 lbs.
 
Yea, well I can always resort to:
 






9/21
approx
300 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn medium elevation on thigh, tightened twice
00
 4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 77 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 79.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 75 six-pace cycles.
 
Warm and sunny with a little shade near the trees.






9/22
approx 730 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights worn high on thigh, tightened once.
00
 4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 76 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 78.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 73.5 six-pace cycles.
 
For the first time in 15 days, I was able to equal my personal record for least number of paces used to complete 440 yds, at this level of body-weights.
 
All the run miles are getting faster, the walked miles are now much slower than the run miles.
 
When I was counting the total time for five miles, two walked and three run, the problem was that this was resulting in very fast walked miles combined with slow run miles.
 
My style of running is changing for IMHO the better. What is natural, has become the heel and the ball of the foot hitting the ground at the same time as opposed to the heel of the foot hitting first.
 
What has become natural, is the hands switching between left in front and right in front during the running, as opposed to what was previously de rigeur, which was the left and right hand moving together during the running.
 
Seems that the key to achieving a very low number of paces per 440 yds using this level of body-weights, is to set aside style, grace, and speed, and focus exclusively on length of pace.






9/25
approx
945 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
Thighweights
worn low on thigh; did not have to be tightened even once
00
 4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 76 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 80.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 73.5 six-pace cycles.
 
Seems a new improvement is hands held further forwards and lower while running.
 
At one point while running, my right hand was moving downwards as my right foot stepped forwards, my left hand was moving downwards as my left foot stepped forwards. This seemed natural and efficient.






9/26
 
approx
700 PM

RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2,0
 
Thighweights worn medium height on thigh, adjusted once

00
 4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 78 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 80 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 72.5 six-pace cycles.

The 72.5 six pace cycles is a new personal record in terms of least number of paces for 440 yds, superseding 73.5 six pace cycles the personal record set Sept 7.
 
Apparently success in terms of reducing number of paces over the 440 yds, has alot to do with the style with which the 440 yds is run. The number of paces is minimized when the speed is just right, not too fast and not too slow. The right balance between length of pace and maintaining momentum is optimal. I am left footed and I find that it can be tricky, avoiding the defect which is long paces with the left foot combined with short paces with the right.
 
Today during every lap except the lap that was the last 440 yd lap of the third mile run, I felt decrepit and tired. Still somehow I came up with the long sought after new personal record in terms of least number of paces used to run the 440 yds.
 
It has become traditional for me to run the last 440 yds of the first mile with an emphasis on length of pace that is not fanatical, and the last 440 yds of the fifth mile with a fanatical emphasis on length of pace.






9/28
approx
745-830 PM; &
1000-1130 PM
RW;
90 min break
RWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
4th 440 yd lap of first run mile, 74 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third run mile, not attempting to use long paces, 80.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth mile, attempting to use long paces, 69 six-pace cycles.
 
The 74 six-pace cycles in the 4th lap of the first mile, was accomplished with just moderate effort put into the lengthening of the paces. Yet this lap decisively beat my previous personal record for least number of steps taken in the 4th lap of the first mile, which was 75.5 six pace cycles on September 15.
 
I had to take a break of approx 90 minutes after the first lap of the third mile because of things like rain.
 
The 69 six-pace cycles in the 4th 440 yd lap of the fifth mile of the workout which is the third run mile, shattered my previous personal record of 72.5 six pace cycles over the 440 yds, which was achieved on September 26.
 
Yesterday September 27 I sort of 'kept the sabbath', by not doing the six mile workout. Still yesterday I worked about fifteen hours without a break on the computer, producing this political science web page.
 
September 20, the previous Sunday, I also 'kept the sabbath' by not working out on that day. Then during the week, on Sept 22 I finally did something I had not been able to do for fifteen days: I equalled the personal record I set for myself on Sept 7 of 73.5 six pace cycles for the 4th lap of the fifth mile which is the third mile run; on September 25 I again did this, and on Sept 26 I set a new personal record for least number of paces on the last lap of the fifth mile the third mile run of 72.5 paces.
 
Seems as if the 'keeping of the sabbath' is improving my performance. Seems to me that this resting on a certain day of the week every week, provides a rhythm to life, which is especially important when there is a lack of routine and rhythm in one's life.
 
Yesterday on Sunday I was thinking, there have already been days this week on which I have skipped the workout so why should I skip the workout today...seemed maybe the important thing is a day of rest each week, regardless of which day of the week. But then I decided to skip the workout as it occurred to me that resting on the same day every week provides a certain rhythm to a life that lacks routine and rhythm.
 
I now estimate that without weights my paces will be 50% longer than they are in the weights, meaning that for instance 3 feet paces will be lengthened to 4.5 feet paces.
 
Therefore I estimate that when my paces are 4 feet a pace in weights, this will equal six feet without weights. Four foot paces would mean 55 six pace cycles over 440 yards. This is important because I've heard that the top runners take paces or strides which are approx equal to their height; I am approx six feet tall.
 
Mile world record holder El-Guerrouj average 7' 2" paces when he set the mile world record. That would be 31 six-pace cycles over 440 yards. 31 six-pace cycles over 440 yds according to my estimate, translates into 46 six-pace cycles in weights.






9/29
approx
515 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 74.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 76.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, attempting to use long paces, 68.5 six-pace cycles.
 
The 76.5 six pace cycles on the last 440 yd lap of of the third mile, which is a run mile, equalled my personal record for least number of paces on this lap. On this lap I do not consciously attempt to use long paces.
 
The 68.5 six pace cycles on the last 440 yd lap of the fifth mile, which is a run mile, is yet another new personal record for least number of paces over 440 yds.
 
The political science web page I mentioned in yesterday's post is at:
 
http://davidvirgil.blogspot.com/2009/09/suffrage-national-performance-behavior.html






9/30/09
approx
7:20 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 74 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 76.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, attempting to use long paces, 69 six-pace cycles.
 
The 74 six pace cycles on the last 440 yd lap of the first (run) mile is equal to my personal best for the first (run) mile in terms of least number of paces; the 76.5 six pace cycles for the last 440 yd lap of the third (run) mile is equal to my personal best in terms of least number of paces for the third (run) mile.






10/1/09
approx
1045 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
 
Weights worn high on thigh, bottom edge of weights approx 8 inches above top of kneecap, did not have to tightened once, fit very well, comfortable
00
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 74.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 78 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, attempting to use long paces, 69 six-pace cycles.
 
It got to be late at night, but I still went out and did the run, despite the cold, despite it being 1045 PM at night, lonely out there on the track.
 
Often when I've been out on the track, these children and teenagers and their coach, the Waltham track club, have been out there too. I find it charming to see children of all different ages having fun together. Last night I had a dream about the track club.
 
In the dream, somehow there were lots of approximately baseball size pieces of betel nut on the track. The pieces were covered with silver (in India they eat betel nut with foil-like pieces of silver on it). This betel nut somehow energized the track club and made them happy; the effect of the betel nut was sort of like the wind blowing the leaves, the leaves being the children and teenagers in the track club.






10/2/09
Approx
930 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 74 six-pace cycles (ties personal record for 4th lap of first mile), consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 77 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 70.5 six-pace cycles.
 
Felt less energetic than usual.
 
It took psychological willpower to push myself out onto the track from 930 PM at night to around midnight, when the track is lonely dark and cold, especially since this was the fifth day in a row doing the six miles without a day off; friday night being out on the track running is weird, which is tough when you already feel overly non-typical or atypical to begin with. 
 
The routine I am doing now is six miles alternating between first lap run, second walked, third run, fourth walked, fifth run, sixth walked. It has evolved into: resting on slow walks, fast runs, and especially fast and energy consuming runs on the last 440 yd lap of each mile run.
 
Whereas when I was timing myself over the entire first five miles of this, I was developing into a thing that walked the walked miles very fast, while running the run miles very slowly, in the process of achieving rapid improvement in terms of total time for the five miles.
 
But as of now I am evolving into a different creature: fast runner, slow walker, especially fast on last quarter mile of miles run, proficient in running quarter miles using long strides. The runner I am now evolving into may not be a big improvement in terms of total time over the first five miles (mile run, mile walked, mile run, mile walked, mile run); but I am much better than I used to be in terms of speed in miles run, speed in quarter mile run, length of stride.
 
I do not think I would have been able to in September make the progress I have made in terms of length of stride, speed of miles run, and speed of quarter-miles run, if I had been putting as much energy into walking the walked miles at a high speed as I did in August.






10/3/09
approx
1030 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
 
For three hours prior to start of workout, worn on both legs
2.0
 
Thighweights worn at mid-elevation, did not have to be tightened once during six miles
 
00
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 76.5 six-pace cycles consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 79.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 69.5 six-pace cycles (lap run unusually slow).
 
This was the third day in a row of not drinking any alcohol in the 24 hours prior to the run. I had to get these accounts done, and I told myself, no drinking until they are done.
 
As according to plan after the Sunday off, six miles were done monday through saturday, for a total of 36 miles this week.






10/4
Sunday
A story about dissent regarding the strategy employed during the month of September
 
Army= my performance on these runs
General Hobbel AKA Hobble = my tactics slash strategy re these runs (hey names found in both the British and German language are a political advantage)
 
On September 7 2009, the army in body-weights, was achieving 73.5 six pace cycles on the last 440 yds of the run fifth mile (while trying to the utmost to maximize stride length and minimize strides or paces required to complete the 440 yards). September 25, eighteen days later, the situation was still the same, 73.5 six pace cycles on last 440 yds of the run fifth mile (while trying to the utmost to maximize stride length and minimize strides or paces required to complete the 440 yards).
 
Therefore during and after mid-september, the consensus amongst the generals was to accuse the commander in chief the great general Hobbel of wasting the army's time and energy by stubbornly adhering to a quixotic  crusade designed to improve stride length and minimize number of strides over 440 yards.
 
Time after time from September 7 to September 25, eleven times, Hobbel threw his army at the goal of attempting to improve stride length, and each time he failed.
 
Said General Blatherson on September 21:
 
"This hyar is a ridiculous waste of th' armah's time an' inergy. Fo' two weeks now thar has been no improvement whutsoevah in terms of increasin' stride len'th while runnin' in body weights. Juneral Hobbel sh'd be eemeejutly relieved of his comman'. Eff'n mah alternative plans had been follered, th' armah'd haf made real progress on over th' past two weeks, as opposed t'th' disaster thet has occurred"
 
This historian must admit, that from September 7 to September 25, there was no progress whatsoever in terms of maximizing stride length over 440 yards.
 
But after zero progress for eighteen days, suddenly on September 26, the army took Hill #73.5 by running 440 yards in body-weights using 72.5 six-pace cycles; on monday September 28, after pausing for the Sunday sabbath on September 27, 440 yards was run in 69 six-pace cycles; and on Tuesday, September 29, 440 yards was run using only 68.5 six-pace cycles.
 
Thus from September 7 to September 25 there was no progress; however from September 7 to September 29, after 18 days without progress, there occurred three straight days of progress, as a result of which, from September 7 to September 29, 22 days, the six-pace cycles required to complete 440 yards dropped from 73.5 to 68.5 a fall of 6.8%.
 
Thus if the number of six-pace cycles required to complete 440 yards continues to fall at the percentage rate it did from September 7 to September 29 the number of six-pace cycles required to complete 440 yards will be (six-pace cycles, number of days from today): 63.8, 22 days; 59.5 44 days; days; 55.5, 66 days; 51.7, 88 days; 48.2 110 days.
 
This in the context of the fact, that when Alan Webb ran the mile in 3:46.9 to set the US record, he ran using 6.44 feet per stride, at 215 strides per minute (http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?board=1&thread=2380174&id=2380174). 6.44 feet per stride amounts to 34.16 six-pace cycles over 440 yards (pace is same thing as stride); this historian estimates that in wrist ankle and thigh body-weights such as the army is wearing, the 34.16 six-pace cycles would increase to 51.2 six-pace cycles over the 440 yards.
 
Thus this historian estimates that at the rate of progress in increasing stride length achieved from September 7 to September 29, the army, accounting for the fact that it is in body-weights whereas Alan Webb the American record holder in the mile was not, will be down to the American mile world record holder stride length in just 88 days, less than three months.
 
Thus in the eyes of this historian as of today, the brilliant general Hobbel (sometimes spelled Hobble) is vindicated and the naysayers, who scoffed at the attempt to improve stride length in body-weights, are found to have been erroneous.
 
This historian concludes that General Kingsley was correct when yesterday he said:
 
"General Hobbel be a military genius uh de highest o'der. Fo' eighteen days, day afta' day he made no progress in his attempts t'improve da damn army's stride lengd. All de generals likes general Bladerson criticized him. But in de face of adversity General Hobbel showed true grit, he stuck t'his guns, he dun did not cut up. Jes hanged loose, brud. And now de army finds itself in a posishun t'be down t'American wo'ld reco'd holda' Alan Webb's stride lengd in less dan dree monds! Right on!"
 
In conclusion, Alan Webb's American world record was 227 seconds for the mile. But all the army needs to achieve is 300 seconds for the mile, if the hope is 720 seconds or twelve minutes over two miles, which is what is postulated as what is needed in order to be able to commit the army to first class soccer combat. Therefore, since 300 divided by 227 is 1.32, and 1.32 times 51.2 is 67.7, the army by achieving 68.5 six pace cycles is almost down to the 67.7 six pace cycles it needs to be down to run the mile in five minutes.
 
Therefore one could opine that the brilliant General Hobbel's strategy has already succeeded in achieving the goal of the military campaign. It is folly, to become focused on abstract numerical achievement of goals,  while losing sight of the ultimate goal at hand; the abstract numerical goals are merely imperfect mechanisms used to achieve the ultimate and realistically important goal.

10/5 The prologue to this table, further up on this page preceding the table, was updated.

10/5
Approx
815 PM
RWRWRW

Untimed untimed

1/2 1.0
2.0
 
Thighweights at mid to high elevation on thigh. Did not slip once. Did not have to be adjusted even once.

10.0
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 75.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 80.0 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 69.5 six-pace cycles.
 
The addition of 10 lbs in the weight vest, resulted in only a 1.5% increase in the number of paces or strides on the 4th lap of the fifth (run) mile. This despite the total poundage of weights worn on the body rising by 143% from seven pounds, 3 lbs on each leg and 0.5 lbs on each wrist, to seventeen pounds, 3 lbs on each leg, 0.5 lbs on each wrist, and ten pounds on the torso.
 
Today the weight vest, filled with 10 lbs of weights, was added to what has become the usual dose of 0.5 lbs each wrist, 1.0 lbs each ankle, 2.0 lbs each thigh, and no weight-vest worn.
 
Seemed a shame to waste the opportunity of the cool fall weather temps, which provide a chance to wear the weight-vest, which is hot in the summer time.
 
After all, the 1/2 lbs each wrist, 1 lb each ankle, 2 lbs each thigh, 10 lbs torso body-weights distribution, corresponds to the proper proportions that I worked out based on weight of various areas of the body, more exactly than 1/2 lbs each wrist 1 lb each ankle 2 lbs each thigh zero lbs torso weight-vest does.
 
The walked miles seemed to be perhaps even steadier and brisker than the walked miles without the 10 lb weights.
 
I expected the whole experience this time, what with the additional 10 lbs not previously worn, to be much more tiring than it turned out to be.
 
It has to be taken into account that today, Monday, was the day after the day of rest, the Sabbath, Sunday.
 
After the workout I had an enjoyable conversation with the young man who works at Domino's on Lexington St. He was from Brazil. He was white. He in his demeanor and face reminded me of Elvis Presley.






10/7
Approx
930 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
3/4
 
First time wristweights worn at this high a poundage.

1.5
 
First time ankleweights
worn at this high a poundage

3.0
 
First time thighweights worn at this high a poundage. Worn medium height. Slipped once.
16
 
First time weightvest
worn at this high a poundage.

4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 76.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 80.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 72 six-pace cycles.
 
The weight total today was much more than it has ever been, doing this six miles in body-weights thing. Wrist, ankle, thigh weights were 50% more than what they usually are, weightvest was at 16 lbs as opposed to usually not being worn.
 
Despite the unprecedented high poundage in body-weights, the stride length on the 4th lap of the fifth (run) mile was equal to my personal record for stride length on the 4th lap of the fifth mile on September 26 ten days ago, when body-weights were at 0.5 lbs each wrist, 1 lb each ankle, 2 lbs each thigh, and no weightvest worn. There have been seven workouts in between Sept 26 and today.
 
My stride length on the last lap of the fifth (run) mile was better than I expected given the high weight load. The main effect of the high weightload was that with each passing mile traversed, I felt much more increasingly fatigued than usual.
 
The previous workout on October 5, the weightvest poundage was up to 10 lbs as opposed to the usual zero. I found that when I slept the night after the workout with 10 lbs on the weightvest, the sleep was more restful than usual. I do not remember most of the dreams I had but for the first time in a while I was having dreams I could remember. Dreaming felt physically pleasurable in my head and in my body; it felt as if the dreaming was producing some kind of recuperative effect in my mind and body.






10/8
Approx
845 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/4
0.5
1.0
 
Thighweights worn mid level elevation on thigh
06
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 71.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 76.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 66.5 six-pace cycles.
 
What has become traditional is to run the last lap of the first third and fifth miles, which are run, at a faster speed than the other run laps.
 
Since October 5, I have been trying out different combinations of weights and building up interesting data. This has to do with how when I studied tactics designed to increase sprint speed and jumping ability, I saw how training combining a diversity of methods worked better than training that used less methods or just one method.
 
Last couple of days I've felt that this six miles daily thing is finally beginning to improve me in terms of my inner spiritual level.
 
I've come to realize that a problem can be that as one improves one's physical conditioning, one regresses in other areas of life. For example the improvement in physical conditioning becomes an excuse for backsliding in terms of alcohol consumption, time management etc.
 
The trick is to combine improvement in physical conditioning with improvement or at least not backsliding in other areas of life. Then the postive impact of physical fitness on the inner spiritual life are fully realized. This is important because I have begun to believe that at least in this area of the world, 'disorganized religion' is superior to 'organized religion'.
 







10/9
 
Regarding my imperfect estimate that my stride length without weights is 1.5 times my stride length in weights
(with weights at wrists 0.5 lbs, ankles 1 lb, thighs  2lbs)
 
'He came up with some wild boasts based on the 1.5X multiplier didnt he?'
 
For a few weeks, I've been having doubts re my initial off the cuff estimate that my stride length without weights is 1.5 times greater than my stride length when wearing 0.5 lbs on each wrist, 1.0 lb on each ankle, 2.0 lbs on each thigh, and 0 lbs on the torso using the weight vest. It has seemed to me that actually the 1.5 multiplier is too high.
 
Note: one four-pace cycle equals four paces/strides/steps; one six-pace cycle equals six paces/strides/steps
 
On Sept 29, I ran the 440 in 68.5 six pace cycles in weights (wrists 1/2, ankles 1, thighs 2 lbs); but it does not look like I will any time very soon, be able to run the 440 without weights in 45.67 six-pace cycles, which is what would be the case if the 1.5 multiplier was exactly valid (45.67 times 1.5 = 68.5).
 
The multiplier that gives an estimate for stride length without weights based on stride length in weights could be variable as opposed to constant; it could change depending upon the stride length in weights.
 
How the 1.5 figure for the multiplier was arrived at
 
The off the cuff estimate of 1.5 for the multiplier was based on the fact that when I was running 220 yard runs this summer before the six-mile project recorded on this page, when I was resting for six minutes between 220 yd runs, the number of paces varied between 35 and 50 four-pace cycles over 220 yards, the normal range was 37-45 four-pace cycles, the 40 four-pace cycles was the most common result.
 
In those days running the 220s, I used to inhale for two paces/strides, and exhale for two paces strides, thus the count was based on four-pace cycles.
 
Now while running and walking six miles in weights I inhale for three paces/strides and exhale for three paces/strides; thus I count the paces/strides in terms of six-pace cycles.
 
Thus the four-pace cycle figures for the 220 translated into six-pace cycles, produces the following valid statement:  the number of paces over 220 yards without weights varied between 23 and 33 six-pace cycles, the normal range was 25-30 six-pace cycles, the 27 six-pace cycles was the most common result.
 
Doubling the figures in the above paragraph to come up with a rough estimate for the number of paces for the 440 yard run without weights one gets: an overall range of 46-67 six-pace cycles, a normal range of 50-60 six-pace cycles, and 54 six-pace cycles as the most common result.
 
Since the most common result running the 440 in weights (wrists: 0.5 lbs; ankles: 1 lbs; thighs: 2 lbs) was about 81 six-pace cycles, and the most common result running the 220 without weights times two, was 54 six-pace  cycles, and 54 times 1.5 is 81, therefore 1.5 was estimated as the multiplier.
 
What the multiplier does and doesnt reveal
 
This rough 1.5 multiplier fails to take into account that fatigue in the 440 run in weights without a six minute break prior to the start of the run, that is not encountered in the 220 run without weights with a six minute break prior to the start of the run, would shift the multiplier.
 
The 1.5 multiplier represents what is estimated to be the case, once endurance is built to the point where the 440 yd run in weights without six minute break preceding start of run, is as tiring as the 220 yd runs without weights, with each run preceded by a six minute break used to be. 
 
The 1.5 multiplier fails to take into account that running 440 yards without weights will take some getting used to after I have been running in weights. It represents what is estimated will be the case once the running without weights is adjusted to.
 
How the multiplier has been useful
 
Whatever its defects 1.5 as the number for the multiplier has served to provide psychological inspiration and optimism and has made the project more interesting.  I have figures available for the inspiring and interesting famous figures of track and field, regarding their stride length without weights and having a multiplier has helped me to relate to them.
 
The multiplier has allowed me to get inspired and focus on and improve my stride length in weights, without actually running the 440s without weights.
 
Soon enough I will run the 440 without weights and the multiplier will become more accurate.  Which leads to the question,  are not therefore the above paragraphs merely pedantic?
 
Why all this pedantic talk?
 
Response: the paragraphs sketch out the technique of  estimating multipliers, and the limitations and uses of multipliers; the paragraphs provide a basis and precedent for paragraphs written in the future re multipliers when more information to base the multipliers on is available; the paragraphs will help me to avoid confusion when comparing future data re the relationship between stride length without weights and stride length in weights  to past information I've gathered and estimates I've made.
 
The paragraphs illustrate a multiplier that gives an idea what would be the case if one progressed to the point where the fatigue of a 440 yd run in weights without rest prior to the start of the run was equal to the fatigue of a 220 yd run without weights with six minutes rest prior to the start of the run.
 
I made some optimistic statements in earlier entries on this page, based on the 1.5 multiplier, and I don't want to give the impression of being a fool. Besides, the paragraphs show off how eloquent detailed, sane, and cogent I can be when discussing such matters.






10/9
approx
1100 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
10
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 71 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 75 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 67.5 six-pace cycles.
 
Continuing with experimenting with new weight distributions, today for the first time the weight distribution was: each wrist 0 lbs; each ankle 0 lbs; each thigh 0 lbs; torso via weightvest 10 lbs.
 
Interesting how, today 10/9 compares to 10/8. On 10/8, with 3.5 lbs on both legs and wrists combined, and 6 lbs on the weightvest, the total in weight was 9.5 lbs compared to the 0 lbs on the legs and wrists and 10 lbs on the torso via the weightvest for a total of 10 lbs today.
 
On 10/8, the figures were (4th lap of given mile): first 71.5, third 76.5, fifth  66.5 (in terms of number of six pace cycles).
 
Comparing 10/8, to today 10/9: today 10/9 the strides were 0.7% longer on the 4th lap of the first (run) mile featuring moderate emphasis on long strides; today 10/9 the strides were 2.0% longer on the 4th lap of the third (run) mile featuring emphasis on speed and no emphasis on long strides; today 10/9 the strides were 1.5% shorter on the 4th lap of the fifth (run) mile featuring extreme emphasis on long strides.
 
On 10/5, the run was done using the same weight on the weightvest as today at 10 lbs, but to this was added 7 lbs on both legs and wrists combined. On 10/5, the figures were (4th lap of given mile): first, 75.5; second 80; third, 69.5.
 
Therefore, I now estimate that the 7 lbs on both legs on 10/5 combined with 10 lbs on the weightvest, compares  with the 0 lbs on the legs and wrists and 10 lbs on the weightvest on 10/9, as follows:
 
7 lbs on the legs and wrists produces: a 6.3% increase in stride length on the fourth 440 yd lap of the first (run) mile during which there is a moderate emphasis on elongating stride length; a 6.7% increase in stride length on the fourth 440 yd lap of the third (run) mile during which there is no emphasis on elongating stride length; and, a 3.0% increase in stride length on the fourth 440 yd lap of the fifth (run) mile during which there is extreme emphasis on elongating stride length.
 
Seems that after the 10/7 and 10/5 runs previous to today featuring heavy weights, I slept better, dreamed better, and felt better compared to after the 10/8 run featuring ligher weights.






10/10
Approx
1130 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
16
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 73 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 78 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 68 six-pace cycles.
 
For the first time since I started counting number of strides for the last 440 yd laps of the miles run, I ran the laps on which the strides were counted wearing my heavy black sweatshirt. The weight of the sweatshirt is significant.
 
For the first time since I started this project August 7, I felt chilly; I felt the need for: warm winter hat; gloves; even warmer socks. The temperature was 45-44 degrees with negligible wind.
 
During the afternoon it was sunny and 60 degrees; then suddenly the night became chilly. The way the temp around here varies so wildly in a given day or between a day and the previous or the next day shocks my body and mind I still have not gotten used to it.
 
My feet felt more sore than they have for a long time. This could be because: the weightvest without ankleweights resulted in forefoot slapping the ground; this was the sixth day in  row doing six miles with weightloads that were usually unusually heavy; the weather was unusually chilly.
 
In the afternoon today at Hannaford Waltham, Chef German E. Lam (German Lam) was giving a demonstration of a Turkey stew. I tried a little bit of it and found it to be very energizing despite only a very small quantity consumed, even though usually Turkey is not one of my preferred foods. The stew did not have the gamey taste that turns me off turkey sometimes, and it did not have the boiled meat taste that I dislike either.






10/12
Sunday night
12:15 AM (10/13
Monday
morning to be exact)
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
3/4
1.5
3.0
 
Worn at mid-level height on thigh; adjusted once; did not slip off even once.
00
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 70.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 74.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 65.5 six-pace cycles.
 
The wrist-weights, ankle-weights, and thigh-weights today were all 50% heavier than the weights used from 8/18 to 10/3; the weightvest weight today was 0, as it was from 8/18 to 10/3. Thus today's performance is comparable to the 8/18 to 10/3 results.
 
My personal records from 8/18 to 10/3: last 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, attempting to use long paces, 74 six-pace cycles (9/28; 9/30; 10/2); last 440 yd lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 76.5 six-pace cycles ( 9/15; 9/29; 9/30); last 440 yd lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 68.5 six-pace cycles (9/29).
 
I switched to changing around the weights from day to day on 10/5. Today, 10/12, after six days of switching around,  I beat my personal records I set when the weights worn were lighter from 8/18 to 10/5.
 
On the last lap of the first (run) mile, the paces used were 4.7% less than my personal record 9/8 to 10/3. On the last lap of the third (run) mile, the paces used were 2.6% less than my personal record 9/8 to 10/3. On the last lap of the fifth (run) mile, the paces used were 4.4% less than my personal record 8/18 to 10/3. This despite the weights used today being 50% higher than those used 9/8 to 10/3.
 
(The difference between the attempting to use long paces on the last lap of the first mile and fanatically attempting to use long paces on the last lap of the fifth mile: on the first I look like a normal runner; on the third I look like a caricature of a runner, like a cartoon character).
 
General Blatherson will no doubt condemn me for sticking with just one weight level from 8/18 to 10/3, before switching to changing the weights around starting 10/3, which apparently produces better results. Yea well I'm the one who succeeded with switching the weights around starting 10/3 not General Blatherson; I'm the one who suspected, based on my studies, that such variation would produce better results. Blatherson's comments and my response, is something I will address later, I report the comments of the generals about once a month. There are reasons for why from 8/18 to 10/3 I stuck with one level of weight.






10/14
Approx
315 AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/4
0.5
1.0
 
Did not have to be readjusted even once during run
00
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 69 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 74 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 64 six-pace cycles.
The weights were just a third of what they were on 10/12; but the number of paces used to complete the 4th laps of the run miles was not as reduced as one might expect.
 
The speed of the first three laps of the run miles, and the speed of the walked miles, was significantly faster than 10/12.






10/25
Approx 1115 AM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
06
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 68 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 72 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 63.5 six-pace cycles.
 
This after ten days of not running. Seems I again slipped into the trap of being afraid of a performance that did not match up to my past performances. Whereas previously the fear that caused skipped practices was a fear of a slow time, this time the fear became, a fear of not achieving long paces.
 
During the time off I discovered yet again that this six miles in weights thing is building up my endurance for things other than sports; on days when I skip the run I have much more endurance for things other than sports than I used to. I accomplished alot in terms of desk work on the computer and housework type stuff during the ten days off.  
 
With regards to the number of six-pace cycles on the last 440 yd lap of the first, third, and fifth (run) miles, with 0 weights on the leg and 10 lbs on the weight vest, the figures were 71-75-67.5 (10/9); with 0 weights on the leg and 16 lbs on the weight vest, the figures were 73-78-68 (10/10). These figures would lead one to expect figures of 69.5-72.5-67 for 0 lbs on the leg and 6 lbs on the weight vest.
 
Thus the paces were longer than what would one expect at this weight level, without a ten day rest, despite the ten day layoff. This tells me that: the ten days of rest did not produce backwards movement in terms of performance on length of pace; and, a rest of between one and ten days can improve the rate of improvement in terms of length of pace, when one has been running six days a week, doing six miles a day in weights.
 
After all, in weightlifting these days, the conventional wisdom is to exercise a given body part no more than once or twice a week.
 
This leads to the idea that the rate of improvement could perhaps be improved by switching to doing this six miles in weights run less than six days a week. Then again, one of the purposes of the six mile run in weights is to improve mood and performance in daily life outside of sports, which inclines me to do the run six days a week.
 
During the last 440 yds lap of the fifth (run) mile, I was gasping for breath to the point where inhaling for three paces and exhaling for three paces was insufficient. I have gotten to the point where I need to shift to inhale for two paces exhale on two paces on this last lap of the fifth (run) mile.






10/27
Approx
115 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
1/2
1.0
2.0
00
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 68.5 six-pace cycles, consciously attempting to use long paces; 4th lap of third (run) mile, not attempting to use long paces, 72.5 six-pace cycles; 4th lap of fifth (run) mile, fanatically attempting to use long paces, 64 six-pace cycles.
 
The above are all personal records at this weight level.
 
From Aug 18 to Oct 3 I wore the weight levels worn today everyday. My personal bests for the six-lap cycle figures referred to in the preceding paragraph during this time period, using the weight levels worn today, were 74, 76.5, 68.5.
 
October 5 I began varying the weights, using different weight levels every day; varying the weights I did 7 runs from Oct 5 to Oct 14; took a ten day break from Oct 14 to Oct 25; and then continued with weight variation Oct 25 and Oct 27. In total up to today from Oct 5 to Oct 27, there have been 9 runs varying the weights.
 
From Oct 5 to Oct 27 using varied weights, the number of strides used has been reduced by: 7.4% on the last lap of the first (run) mile, the lap involving a conscious but not fanatic attempt to use long paces; 5.2% on the last lap of the second (run) mile, the lap not involving conscious attempt to run using unusually long paces; and 5.8% on the last lap of the fifth (run) mile, the lap involving fanatic attempt to run using extra long paces.
 
Thus with the weights at today's level, as of now when making a normal-running-form moderate attempt to lengthen stride on the last 440 yd lap of the first mile, my stride length is the same as it was on Sept 29,  during the lap during which I set a  personal record for the lap featuring making  a fanatic abnormal-running-form attempt to lengthen stride.
 
And when making no attempt to lengthen stride above what comes naturally when I run faster than usual, I am now at a stride length (72.5 six pace cycles per 440 yds)  equal to what my personal record was for stride length on the lap featuring a fanatic attempt to maximize stride length on Sept 26.
 
Pro-Soccer Level Fitness by 2010?
 
Alot of people think that if I can combine my skill in soccer, doing things like sprinting twenty yards while keeping the soccer ball close to my body and off the ground touching the ball with alternating left and right feet, with physical endurance, I will be one of the world's top soccer players.
 
My estimate is that to be in good enough shape for top level pro soccer I need to, with no weights worn, run two miles in twelve minutes.
 
My calculation is that I need to get down to 58 six-pace cycles per 440 yards without weights, to run a six minute mile. This is based on: Webb's American record mile time times 1.7 is six minutes; Webb ran using 6.44 foot length paces; 6.44 divided by 1.7 is 3.8 feet; at 3.8 feet per pace there are 58 six pace cycles per 440 yards.
 
At the monthly percentile rate of progress during October, by January 1 2010 two months from now, when lengthening pace while maintaining normal form and not straining myself, I will be down to 59 six-pace cycles per 440 yards wearing the weight levels worn today.
 
Evidence indicates that length of stride improvement will be accelerated if these weighted six mile runs are done less than six times per week.
 
October 12, with the weights at 10.5 lbs on the legs and wrists and 0 lbs on the weightvest/torso, the last laps of the first, third, and fifth (run) miles required in terms of six-pace cycles: 70.5, 74.5, and 65.5. October 14 with the weights at 3.0 lbs on the legs and wrists and 0 lbs on the torso, the figures were: 69, 74, and 64. Thus mathematically one would expect that today October 27 with 7 lbs on the legs/wrists and 0 lbs on the torso, the figures to be: 70, 74.5, and 65. In reality, the figures turned out to be: 68.5, 72.5, and 64.
 
Today with 7 lbs on the legs/wrists, the strides compared to October 14 with 3 lbs on the legs/wrists, were actually longer on the last 440 yd lap of the first and third (run) miles, and the same length on the last 440 yd lap of the fifth (run) mile.
 
I did not run from October 14 to October 25; then I ran on October 25 and October 27.
 
This leads me to again conclude that running this six miles in weights thing, the progress could be speeded by doing the run on less than six days per week.
Other Observations
 
The last laps of the first, third and fifth miles are run much faster than the other laps of these miles. The last lap of the first features strides that are deliberately longer than usual, without deviation from what is normal running form. The last lap of the third features no attempt to lengthen stride above and beyond what comes naturally when trying to run faster than usual. The last lap of the fifth features a cartoonish fanatical attempt to maximize stride length, which invoves deviation from good form and is very exhausting.
 
A few hours after the run I began to feel exhausted and almost sick; I think this was because of the fatigue of the run combined with exposure to cigarette smoke created due to others smoking cigarettes.






11/2
after-
noon
R W 3/4R
Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
0
4th 440 yd lap of first (run) mile, 67 six-pace cycles, consciously but not fanatically attempting to use long paces.
 
I had to cut short the run because of the beginning of a Waltham High School Girl's soccer game.
 
Sunday November 1, I weighed myself for the first time in a long time; I weighed 194 lbs in shoes shorts shirts and sweatshirt. During October I carefully measured my height, it was 5' 10.5" (a few years ago, a few years after I had  'stopped growing' and reached adult age, during a difficult time in my life I was down to 5' 9.5").
 
This indicates to me that I am on the path that leads to a combination of long distance running type physical endurance, together with a heavy strong muscular body (as opposed to long distance run ability that is based on being lightweight combined with extraordinary aerobic ability to process and use oxygen through breathing).
 
Prior to starting these runs in August I had not weighed myself in a long time, the last time I had weighed myself I was 180 lbs.
 
I was expecting to weigh around 160 lbs, due to the heavy workouts combined with eating little.
 
Looks like I have succeeded in achieving the new American dream of combining fat loss with muscle gain (the old American dream of a house & a lawn in the burbs with two cars in the garage etc is history). I've lost fat in the stomach area, and elsewhere, but this has been compensated for with muscle gain. It has been pointed out to me that my calf muscles have become noticeably developed. Personally I've noticed that something like an even layer of muscle of a thickness of about 1/4" has been added on almost every square inch of my body's surface; my thighs have become deeper and wider; the running wearing wrist-weights has had a surprisingly significant impact in terms of muscle strength/definition in the arms; the weight-vest has had a similar effect on my torso.
 
Looking in the mirror in the morning recently, the sun was shining in through the window to my right. The diffused daylight bounced off the light colored walls. The general effect was that I was slightly sidelit. In this light my body looked sort of heroic and godlike; evenly balanced strength as opposed to certain parts extremely strong; no visible fat. Interesting how much lighting can effect the way the body looks. I used to think lighting effected the way a face looks but not so much the body.
 
October 30 and October 31 I did about 13 hours of moving work, moving stuff from one apartment to another. This got me too tired to do the six mile run. Problem with physically exhausting work is that it tires me out so that I dont do sports workouts. This is especially a problem with someone who is potentially an all-time great in sports like me.






11/9
Updated 11/10
Running in varied heavy weights on five days in a week in October Produced Dramatic Improvement
 
One can see looking at the 'Personal Bests' table below, that from 10/5 to 10/11 I ran on five days, wearing different mixes of heavy weights, with the 'Heaviness Rating' (see table notes) describing the relative heaviness burden of the weights, at high levels. This resulted in dramatic progress as evinced by the 10/12 run, which featured strides longer than on 9/29 when the personal best at a lighter weight featured shorter strides compared to 10/12. The average 'heaviness rating' during these five days was 7 (5 is the average heaviness rating). Four of the five runs during the six days were with weights at an above average heaviness rating and one was with weights at an average heaviness  rating.
 
The big improvement with the heavy weights doing five runs in seven days 10/5 to 10/11, indicates that about five runs per seven days would by optimal when using heavy weights. By way of comparison in the section entitled "Evidence indicates that length of stride improvement will be accelerated if these weighted six mile runs are done less than six times per week" in the Nov 2 entry,  I stated:
 
"Today (Nov 2) with 7 lbs on the legs/wrists, the strides compared to October 14 with 3 lbs on the legs/wrists, were actually longer on the last 440 yd lap of the first and third (run) miles, and the same length on the last 440 yd lap of the fifth (run) mile. I did not run from October 14 to October 25; then I ran on October 25 and October 27.This leads me to again conclude that running this six miles in weights thing, the progress could be speeded by doing the run on less than six days per week".
Attempting to synthesize the two ideas: five runs and two days of rest in seven days using heavy weights, can produce a (estimated by extrapolating from 10/12 run) a 5.4% increase in stride length, which is a faster rate of improvement compared to using the same relatively light 7 lbs on the legs 0 on the torso on every run running about five days per week; ten days of rest can produce a 1.6% increase in stride length (extrapolating from 10/27 run), which is a surprisingly high rate of improvement without effort, compared to the rate of improvement running with 7 lbs on the legs 0 on the torso day after day, every day.
 
Thus it appears that: if I run varying weights for about five days per week, and then rest for a few days when I feel I a need a rest, which is a 'bipolar(?)' combination that comes naturally to me, I will progress at a fast enough rate, and at the same time be able to use the days off for various activities other than weighted runs.
 
Seems to me that at this point it might be optimal to alternate between a day of weighted runs, and a day of air-dribble with the soccer ball, meaning sprinting while keeping the ball off the ground but close to my body. Perhaps the weighted runs could be done every other day while the air-dribble is done every day except Sunday.
 
The ball-juggling skills degenerate due to lack of practice; the ball-juggling skills impress adn entertain people; looks like soon circumstances will force me into practicing and running in athletics facilities which will put me in the limelight.
 
Personal Bests Table
 
HR stands for Heaviness Rating. HR is an estimate of the relative extent to which the weight combination burdens the body. Each weight combination is given a number from 9 to 1. The weight combination rated at 9 is the one I now consider heaviest. The weight combination rated at 1 is the one I now consider lightest. The median heaviness rating is 5. The calculation is complicated due to the continual rapid day to day improvement.
 
  Lbs wts total on ankles, wrists, and thighs
Lbs wts total on torso/ weight-
vest
number of six-pace cycles required to
complete 440 yd run
     
  Date
Limb
wts
Vest
wts
1st
440
2nd
440
3rd 
440
HR Rating
Comment


   9/28  7  0  74      HR=3    
   9/29  7  0    76.5  68.5  HR=3    
   10/5  7  10  75.5  80  69.5  HR=8    
   10/7  10.5  16  76.5  80.5  72  HR=9    
   10/8  3.5  6  71.5  76.5  66.5  HR=5    
   10/9  0  10  71  75  67.5  HR=6    
   10/10  0  16  73  78  68  HR=7    
   10/12  10.5  0  70.5  74.5  65.5
HR=4
Definitely greater  burden compared to 9/28-9. Yet much longer strides. All attributable to five runs with varying weights.
   
   10/14  3.5  0  69  74  64
HR=2
3.5 limbs, 0 vest, & 0 limbs, 6 vest, are the closest to 0 limbs, 0 vest.
   
   10/25  0  6  68  72  63.5
HR=1
One of closest to zero weight levels
   
   10/27  7  0  68.5  72.5  64
HR=3
Definite improvement
compared to 9/28-9 at this weight.
   
   11/2  0  0  67    
 HR=0
Getting out of practice(?)
   
   11/10  0    71  62  HR=0    
                   
                   
 





11/11
RWRW
Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
0
At this zero weights level, the first 440, which is the last lap of the first (run) mile, was done 11/2, and took 67 six-pace cycles to complete.
 
Hence today, the fourth 440 yd lap of the first (run) mile was the lap in which no conscious effort was made to lengthen strides, it required 71 six-pace cycles to complete; the fourth 440 yd lap of the third (run) mile was the lap which involved fanatic effort to lengthen strides, it took 62 six-length paces to complete. Again the lap involving fanatic pace-lengthening effort was run on an inhale over two paces, exhale over two paces basis.
 
Estimates re what one would expect the pace length to be today with zero weights on the body are complicated by factors such as the gradual improvement apparently produced by ten days rest Oct 14 to Oct 25. It seems that the pace length today was about what one would expect if the running only 18 miles between 10/14 and 11/10 were to have no negative impact on pace length.
 
Looking at: 10/12, 10.5 lbs on limbs 0 on torso (65.5 six pace cycles); 10/14, 3.5 lbs on limbs zero on torso (64 six-pace  cycles); and 10/27, 7 lbs on limbs 0 lbs on torso (64 six-pace cycles);one would expect the lap with the fanatical effort to lengthen paces today, to require approx 63 six-pace cycles to complete. Looking at 10/9, 0 lbs on limbs 10 lbs on torso (67.5 six pace cycles); 10/10, 0 lbs on limbs 16 lbs on torso (68 six-pace cycles); and 10/25, 0 lbs on limbs, 6 lbs on torso (63.5 six pace cycles); one would expect the fanaticism about length of pace lap today, to require approx 61 six-pace cycles to complete.






Saturday
11/21
940 PM - 1210 AM Sunday
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0.75 lbs
1.5 lbs
3.0 lbs
16 lbs
Version 2 11:53 PM 11/23/2009
Version 3 3:47 AM 11/27/2009
 
The 'heaviness rating' (HR) concept I introduced in the Nov 9 entry above on this same web page. I defined HR as "an estimate of the relative extent to which the weight combination burdens the body".
The HR avoids the error of failing to realize that weights have different effects depending upon where on the body they are worn.
 
There are certain standard combinations of weight levels I use on wrists, ankles, thighs, and torso during these runs. These combinations are based on my theory and research re proportional weights of the human body (see  "Ideal proportional weights for wrist, ankle, thigh and vest in sports training"  http://coolname001.angelfire.com/bodyweightproportions.htm). 
 
The 'heaviness rating' (HR) allows me to gauge how heavy (in terms of practical impairment of running and walking miles) a given combination is compared to another combination. Using the HR, I put together a schedule that alternates heavy days with light days in a way that evenly spreads out the burden of heaviness:
 
Weighted Runs Schedule
 
           

Day
total
weight
on limbs
lbs
total
weight
on torso
lbs
heaviness
rating
(HR)


1
10.5
16
9


2
0
0
0


3
3.5
6
5


4
10.5
0
4


5
7
10
8


6
0
6
1


7
0
10
6


8
7
0
3


9
0
16
7


10
3.5
0
2

 
Method of schedule in above table: There are five pairs, each combining a high weight day with a low weight day, the combined heaviness rating of each pair is 9. Some of the pairs are high contrast pairs with a large difference between the heavy day and the light day; the high contrast pairs are alternated with the low contrast pairs.
 
Thus, as this is the first day with the new schedule, today the weights were at the max, 10.5 lbs on the legs and 16 lbs on the torso.
 
For now I intend to for a change not keep track of the number of paces required to complete the last 440 lap of the first third and fifth miles which are run miles. I estimate that a result of keeping track is that I run the laps on which the paces are not counted too slowly, and walk the walked miles too slowly, as a way of saving up energy for great performances on the laps on which I count the number of paces.
 
In accordance with the theory of variation-maximization I have been developing, which is increasingly backed by evidence, I estimate that to maximize rate of improvement in both sprints and long distance, I should now do some practice sessions involving air-dribbling the soccer ball (sprinting approx 15 yards while keeping the soccer ball off the ground but close to the body, touching the ball primarily with left and right feet) while wearing various combinations of weights.
 
Such is not something I really want to do, because I enjoy impressing myself and others with fine performances of air-dribbling, and the weights are sure to impair performance. However according to my theory of variation-maximization, juggling the soccer ball while wearing weights should increase the rate of improvement in sprints and long distances because such adds variety to the workout schedule.
 
November 12, after not having practiced soccer for 59 weeks, I returned to practicing soccer; I practiced soccer Nov 12, 14, 18, and 19. The soccer workout log is at http://www.angelfire.com/ma/vincemoon/soccairfourteen.htm.






Monday
11/23
 
Friday
11/27
Nov 21 entry revised to:
Version 2 11:53 PM 11/23/2009
Version 3: 3:47 AM 11/27/2009
 
Nov 23, a correction in the Nov 21 entry 'Weighted Runs Schedule' was that the table column title was changed to 'total weight on limbs', to account for the fact that this total covers wrists, ankles and thigh weights not just ankles and thigh weights.
 
Nov 27, I detected a mistake in the "Weighted Runs Schedule" table in the Nov 21 entry. The row for day 9, by mistake, had 10 for total weight on limbs, 10 for total weight on torso, and 7 for heaviness rating. This has been corrected to, 0 for total weight on limbs, 16 for total weight on torso.
 
 
November 21 Entry 'Weighted Runs Schedule' corrections.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Monday
11/30
approx
1230 PM - 240 PM

RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
0
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, without wearing weights, without timing, and without keeping track of number of paces used to complete any 440 yard lap.
 
I could feel how doing sprints while juggling the soccer ball while wearing weights the past few days (http://www.angelfire.com/ma/vincemoon/soccairfourteen.htm), had improved my ability to run the mile, as I expected in accordance with my law of maximization of variation.
 
Today, more than at any time since I returned to long distance running in order to repair my decline from superior to virtual cripple: I felt bouncy while running; it felt easier to get the feet up and forwards while running; the running felt faster than at any previous time; and there was little fatigue.
 
Getting the feet up to an optimal height above the ground while running makes sense; when we throw a ball, to achieve maximum distance we throw the ball at an upwards angle not parallel to the ground; in running the foot is similar to the ball in throwing.






Wednesday
12/2
approx
445-645 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0.25
0.5
1
6
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 3.5 lbs on my limbs, and 6 lbs on on the torso, without timing, and without keeping track of number of paces used to complete any 440 yard lap.
 
As of now, I've decided to try to alternate between a day doing this run, and a day doing the soccer workouts described in my soccer log at  http://www.angelfire.com/ma/vincemoon/soccairfourteen.htm. I discuss the reasoning behind this in the December 1 entry of the soccer log. Seems that: the kind of intense brain activity involved in sprinting while keeping the soccer ball off the ground but close to the body, interferes with my ability to dream or my ability to remember my dreams; and that this in return has significant negative repercussions in terms of my ability to appreciate other persons and make social decisions.
 
Steve Pagliuca is running for US senator from Massachusetts to replace Ted Kennedy. A message was left on my answering machine it was Mr. Pagliuca saying something. Yesterday morning I wrote a poem and sent it to him, cc-ing one of his opponents Martha Coakley. Perhaps it would be financially advantageous to not admit this, but the poem was based on a dream. Most poems could be improved with a re-write but all these re-writes take time. Right now the only change I can think to make in the poem is that perhaps in the poem it should be made clear that the new cozy places for people to meet on the 'Euroyard' campus, were outdoors places such as mini-ampitheaters resembling those of the Greek civilization. Seems getting in shape improves my ability to do things like write poetry. The poem:
 
David Virgil Hobbs
The new Harvard, Euroyard

In a world somewhat different from this world,
I saw a Harvard university,
Where the psychological atmosphere,
Was different from what Harvard has become.
This different Harvard that never was,
I shall for now refer to as Euroyard. 

      Euroyard, was in Cambridge like Harvard,
      But the landscaping and architecture,
      Was in Euroyard somewhat different. 
      Euroyard's landscaping and architecture
      Resulted in it compared to the old Harvard,
      Being more isolated from Cambridge,
      And having more cozy locations fit
      For gatherings of persons within
 
Euroyard's atmosphere psychological,
Was humbler, more loving, more natural
Euroyard had much more, compared to Harvard
Of Europoids of all different colors,
Loving each other and enjoying the
Caucasian race's diversity
 
A rare thing it would have been for me,
To walk through Euroyard University
Without some lovable Caucasian
Or if you like Europoid young woman, 
Running up to me joyfully
And hugging me and kissing me
 
@2009 David Virgil Hobbs






Saturday
12/5
approx
345-600 PM
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0.75
1.5
3.0
0
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 10.5 lbs on my limbs, and 0 lbs on on the torso, without timing, and without keeping track of number of paces used to complete any 440 yard lap.
 
Nov 21 run on, though I have not been counting paces, I have been: running the last 440 yd lap of the first mile with long strides; running the last 440 yd lap of the third mile especially fast without trying to use long strides; and running the last 440 yd lap of the fifth mile using fanatically long strides.
 
I washed the thighweights in dishwashing liquid and water the day  before the run, taking care to scrape all the soap and 'dirt' off the inside area of the thigh-weights. Again the result was an improvement in thighweight performance. Even though each weight was at the max 3 lbs, the weights only had to be re-tightened once.
 
At the start of the run it was raining, by the end of the run it was snowing; during the last run mile the fifth mile my toes felt numb and sore.
 
Clothing worn: shoes, socks, underpants, shorts, sleeveless t-shirt, t-shirt, long sleeved t-shirt, sweatshirt, rain-jacket, big headband, about three inches from top of head band to bottom of headband I once saw David Beckham wear a headband of this type), fisherman's (circular rim type) hat, gloves.
 
The clothing was warm and enough, not wearing gloves would have been very uncomfortable.
 
Looks like I have gotten to the point where I will have to shell out big bucks to my alma mater Harvard, and use their athletic facilities for the six mile runs.
 
I estimate for running outdoors, for at least the next week, I will still be able to run in almost 40 degree weather, if I run from noon to 2:00 PM. But this ignores the complication of sludge, snow, ice, and water on the ground.
 
During the run, the temp ranged from 40 to 37 degrees, wind speed 1-4.5 mph, wind gusts 0-13.4 mph, precipitation, hourly rainfall rate, 0.01 - 0.03 inches (http://www.wunderground.com/weatherstation/WXDailyHistory.asp?ID=KMAWALTH6&month=12&day=5&year=2009). So even though it was snowing at the end of the run, the temp was still not down to freezing.






Saturday
12/12
approx
600 PM-750 PM 
RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0.5
1.0
2.0
10
Sludge and water turn to ice While Temperature Drops from 42 to 40 degrees
 
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 7 lbs on my limbs, and 10 lbs on on the torso, without timing, and without keeping track of number of paces used to complete any 440 yard lap.
 
I ran: the last 440 yd lap of the first mile with long strides; the last 440 yd lap of the third mile especially fast without trying to use long strides; the last 440 yd lap of the fifth mile using normal strides, instead of the usual fanatically long strides, because I was forced to run on bumpy sludgy snowy wet grass the fifth mile.
 
Before leaving for the track, I used an "all purpose sprayer" from Home Depot to spray the area of my thighs where I fasten the thighweights with a little water. I then fastened the thighweights to the thighs, and also put on all the other weights, before heading out to the outdoors Leary Field track in Waltham.
 
During the run the thighweights did not slip off once, and were reattached only once, which validates the use of the sprayer.  I've noticed that before I begin to perspire or sweat, thigh-weights slipping off is a much more common thing.  
 
A few hours before the run, I drove down to the outdoors track and inspected it; the track was covered with a layer of sludge (sort of in between water and ice, like soft ice) about three inches thick; I concluded that the track was unusable.
 
But then during the evening news, Harvey Leonard the WCVB weatherman surprised me with his forecast regarding the warm temperatures for the remainder of the evening, earlier forecasts had not predicted this. So I returned to the track to check it out again--the north side of the track for about 150 yards, looked useable, the surface was merely wet because the temperature had warmed and melted the sludge.
 
So I went home and put the weights on and returned to the track to do the run.
 
During the first mile I noticed that the west, east, and south sides of the track were in much worse shape than the north side in terms of being covered with sludge-like half-melted ice. As the run progressed from approx 900 PM to midnight, the sludge and the water on the track gradually turned to ice, despite the fact that the temperature never dropped below 40 degrees, thus slipping became a more and more common occurrence, and I had to run slower and slower; I estimate I slipped about twenty times.
 
During the run the temperature never dropped below 40 degrees, the wind was very calm, there was a little precipitation during the first third of the run. Yet still, during the run, the sludge and the water turned to ice!
 
Finally I fell down to the ground, the only fall of the entire run, at the end of the fourth mile, due to slipping on ice.  By the time of the fifth mile, the track was almost like a skating rink; on most of the track surface I could slide across the track like a skater; I had to run the fifth mile and walk the sixth mile on the snowy, wet, bumpy long grass immediately inside the perimeter of the track.
 
The entire time the running and walking was more difficult than a normal day, yet still I completed the entire six miles with only about six minutes of breaks total.
 
The run taught me how treacherous sludge and water can be when the temperature is above freezing and falling. One does not realize the temperature is falling because one is gradually being heated up by the exercise; then one is surprised to find that the sludge and the water have turned to ice. The most surprising thing is that although the temperature has made only a small change from 42 degrees to 40 degrees which is till way above freezing, the sludge and the water still turns to ice!
 
Understanding sludge and water turning to ice could have important repercussions from the point of view of public safety. I have spun out of control while driving a car only a couple of times my entire driving career; both times the problem was ice on the unsalted or less salted edge of the road while making a turn. Many elderly people fall and break bones because of ice. Snow is not a big problem for slipping, but snow that has melted and then turned to ice is a big problem for slipping.
 
The sludge and water turning to slippery ice, emotionally to me felt like a brother who does not do a good job of being a brother. I confess I cursed my brother who does not do a good job of being a brother, almost every time I slipped on the ice. But I take those curses back and cancel them now.
 
Clothing worn: shoes, socks, underpants, shorts, sweatpants, sleeveless t-shirt, t-shirt, long sleeved t-shirt, sweatshirt, rain-jacket, hat made from sweater type material, gloves. The gloves got too warm after a couple of miles and I took them off to cool off; nevertheless the sludge and water turned to ice.
 
During the run, the temp ranged from 42 to 40 degrees, wind speed 0 mph, wind gusts mph, precipitation/hourly rainfall rate, 0.04 - 0.01 inches first hour, 0 inches thereafter.  (http://www.wunderground.com/weatherstation/WXDailyHistory.asp?ID=KMAWALTH6&month=12&day=9&year=2009).






Wednesday
12/9
approx
900 PM-1200 
midnight
1.5 miles R; 1 W;
0.5 W; 0.5 R; 1 W; 1 R
 

Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
06
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 0 lbs on my limbs, and 6 lbs on on the torso, without timing, and without keeping track of number of paces used to complete any 440 yard lap.
 
I ran: the last approx 440 yd lap of the first mile with long strides; the last approx 440 yd lap of the third mile especially fast without trying to use long strides; the last approx 440 yd lap of the fifth mile using fanatically long strides. Today was the first time I did this run indoors in the gym.
 
At first due I mistakenly thought that 28 laps of the gym would be a mile; that is why the first segment was a 1.5 mile run instead of the usual 1 mile. Then I realized that my best estimate as of now is that 19 laps of the gym is one mile.






Sunday
12/13
approx
345 PM-550 
 

RWRWRW
Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
10
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 0 lbs on my limbs, and 10 lbs on on the torso, without timing, and without keeping track of number of paces used to complete any 440 yard lap.
 
I ran: the last approx quarter mile 5 laps of the first mile with long strides; the last 5 laps of the third mile especially fast without trying to use long strides; the last 5 laps of the fifth mile using the usual fanatically long strides.
 
The run was based on an estimate of 19 laps of the gym equals one mile.
 
I started this run just 15 minutes after completing a soccer workout (http://www.angelfire.com/ma/vincemoon/soccairfourteen.htm).






Wednesday
12/16
approx
730 PM-945 PM 
Waltham Y
 


RWRWRW

Untimed
untimed
0.5
1.0
2.0
00
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 7 lbs on my limbs, and 0 lbs on on the torso,  on two different treadmill machines at the Y. The basketball courts were being used by the corporate basketball league. Wow those guts can finish a hard day at the corporation, then play basketball, then fall asleep and work at the corporation the next day.
 
I wrapped the left thighweight in the CVS bandage; the right thighweight was as usual. The left thighweight never had to be even tightened; the right thighweight had to be tightened once.
 
Today I did not follow the usual practice of running the last quarter miles of the run miles first with long strides, then especially fast, and then with fanatically long strides.
 
The first mile on the treadmill, I ran 0.6 miles at 3.5 mph, quickstart manual settings, no inputting of my personal body weight, no incline.
 
Then I took a break for approx 5 minutes, not because of fatigue, but because the pain the arches of my feet had become unbearable. This treadmill, a Life-Fitness 95Ti, was extremely soft in terms of the way it felt when my feet hit the treadmill. I felt a strong need to tighten my shoelaces.
 
Previously I used to experience such pain running outdoors but I had gotten over it. Then I did the remaining 0.4 miles at 3.5 mph.
 
Then I walked the second mile, on the same treadmill, in 23:27 at speeds varying between 2 and 3.5 mph.  
 
After the first two miles I took a break for about 20 minutes to take notes.
 
Miles three to six, I did on a Startrac treadmill. The big numbers on the back rear of this treadmill were: 7631-SUSAPO; AP61016855; the phone number given on this treadmill was, 1-877-STARTRAC. On this treadmill, the pain in the arches of the feet, which had been so severe on the Lifefitness T91, was almost nonexistent for every mile run and walked. This Startrac treadmill felt much harder and firmer in terms of the feet to treadmill interaction.
 
The third run mile I did at 3.5 mph; the fourth walked mile at speeds varying between 2 and 3 mph in 20:41; the 5th run mile at 3.5 mph; the 6th walked mile at 2-3.5 mph in 19:01. This was all done with no breaks during the run miles, and a short break during the sixth walked mile.
 
The treadmill forces shorter choppier steps compared to running on the ground. I estimated that each step was 34 inches in length. This would, for purposes of comparison with earlier records on this page regarding number of paces required to complete 440 yards, come to 78 six pace cycles per 440 yards.
 
Treadmill running and normal ground running are different. Earlier I had found that, when used to the treadmill, the time required to complete a mile on ground, is about ten percent greater than the time required to complete a mile on the treadmill.
 
Today, having become used to running on ground, I found that a mile run or walked in a given amount of time, was more tiring than a mile run or walked in the same time outdoors.
 
I felt annoyed by the fact that it was impossible to completely cover up the annoying electronically generated info on the startrac treadmill, even using a big clipboard. I was unable to move the clipboard so as to uncover and see the annoying info (which I sometimes want to see), without having to hold the clipboard with my hand or place it on some object other than the treadmill, such as a neighboring treadmill. Both the Startrac and the Lifefitness 95Ti, did not have a button for simply turning the annoying electronically generated info on and off.
 
During the last run mile, the fifth mile, my heart rate varied between 132 to 137. I admire the way these treadmills are able to measure heart rate just through the hands holding bars.
 
After the workout, I drank red wine and ate up a Chinese food appetizer plate featuring egg roll, beef teriyaki, chicken fingers, and pork ribs. The meal was tasty and enjoyable; but yet again, as a result of the wine and food, I found myself out of commission, too tired and sleepy to function, for about seven hours due to the meal.
 
I've heard that one has a 2.5 hour window of opportunity after a workout to get protein into the body so that the protein will develop the muscles exercised during the workout; but I often have no appetite after a workout. Therefore I have been drinking wine after a workout, not because I especially like or am addicted to wine, but due to the need to generate an appetite. However now I think that I should just do my best to consume some protein after a workout without drinking any alcohol, because I end up being put out of commission so to speak as a result of the wine and the food.
 
For me, wine and food means the end of the day for me as a productive active person. Generally I find that alcohol is enjoyable for me only under the following approximate conditions: I have been awake for eleven hours before drinking; I have exercised heavily before drinking. Problem is that I have been drinking wine after a workout before having been awake for eleven hours.






Thursday
12/17

Dream about festivities involving Harvard University and Jack Williams
 
Approx 10 hours after the workout mentioned in the previous entry, finally, after lying awake in bed for a long time too stuffed with wine and food to function but unable to sleep, I managed to fall asleep and had an interesting and enjoyable dream.
 
I do not remember all the details or the exact order of the scenes in the dream. Thus the narrative I present here will have left out some details, and the order of the scenes is probably not the same as it was in the dream. After I had the dream, I scribbled some notes about the dream in a notebook. Problem is, a couple of the words I scribbled, I myself could not tell what the words were. Then thinking back on the dream I realized that the illegible words were "Harvard dorms". The notes were minimal, because I figured I would be able to remember everything of importance in the dream later on without notes. Next time, I'll take more careful notes, and write them more carefully so as to prevent the silliness of being unable to read my own handwriting.
 
Scene 1
Seemed I was on the campus of my alma mater, Harvard University. The rooms at Harvard were very big with high ceilings, and dimly lit. A young man was on his way to some festivities. I joined him and followed him to the festivities. There was a big partly transparent elevator, with alot of horizontal floor space in it. Vertically up the elevator, musical bands of Afro-americans were practicing in the elevator. We got on the elevator and took it downwards to the festivities.
 
Scene 2
The festivities were in what seemed to be a huge underground dimly lit hall with high ceilings. There were alot of Harvard affiliated people at the festivities. Seemed that most of the people at the festivities wore either a crimson robe, or a white robe (the Harvard colors are white and crimson). When I first entered the hall, a young white man in a robe told me that persons who smoked pot or engaged in some other proscribed activity (which I do not now remember) were not allowed into the festivities. I told him, that I was surprised by this because so many people smoked pot.
 
Scene 3.
In the big underground dimly lit hall with the high ceiling, there was a square area, about 15 yards by 15 yards, about 20 feet below ground level, which one reached through a staircase. In this below ground level area, there was a rectangular dinner table that seated about ten people, covered by a white table cloth. The WBZ TV announcer Jack Williams was there, sitting by himself. The table was covered with what looked like the remnants of a dinner involving several persons, that had recently ended. Then Jack Williams was up at ground level, and walked past me on his way to somewhere. In the dream Jack Williams and I were friends who knew each other. I said to him, "great to see ya".
 
Scene 4
Mark Nash, was a black guy from Chicago was a boyhood friend of mine who recently died.  I could hear him angrily threatening some people who were afraid of him, somewhere in the huge dimly lit hall with the high ceiling.
 
Scene 5
I passed by a slightly scary black young man, somewhere in the huge dimly lit hall with the high ceiling. He had some kind of job, sitting behind a desk in one of the huge rooms, checking people who came into the room. I assured him that I was American. I told him that I used American phrases like 'doggone' (studying the classic 1970s song 'Funky Nassau', I earlier when awake had noticed that in the song the singer uses the word 'doggone', a word characteristic of American boys, several times). You can hear 'Funky Nassau', a great piece of music, at http://www.rhapsody.com/the-beginning-of-the-end/funky-nassau. The singer in the song reminds me of myself as a boy.
 
Scene 6
Harvard undergrads live in dorms with names like Currier House, Kirkland House, Mather House, etc etc. Two teams representing two of these dorms were about to play each other in some sport. One of the teams represented Currier House. I'm not sure which dorm the other represented; the other team represented Kirkland or some other dorm.
 
Scene 7
In one of the big dimly lit rooms with a ceiling, there was a dark brown unusually shaped couch, with a pretty white female lying in it. Jack Williams joined her in the couch and started having sex with her without taking off his clothes. While this happened, instead of watching them have sex, I looked out a window, into the daylight outside (this contradicts the feeling I had that the entire huge hall with the high ceilings was underground) and set off some firecrackers.
 
Scene 8
I was in yet another huge dimly lit room in the huge hall. In this one the ceiling was about forty feet above the ground, and there was a stage about thirty feet above the ground near the far wall. On the stage there was a partially clothed white woman. She was extremely tall, heavily built without being fat, and pretty. She had straight brown hair, wore lipstick, and had very big thighs that were not covered by clothing. Next to her on some kind of white-background board, was written in big letters, "Overthruuw", spelled with two u's (there used to be this American-nationalist website on the internet, which was anti-Jewish and anti-black, though it was condescendingly friendly with blacks. It was despite its faults an entertaining and informative website. It's name was overthrow.com). Near the wall on my left, and near the wall on my right, lots of people were sitting or standing. I was standing in the middle of the big room by myself with nobody near me. In response to something the woman on the stage said to me, I said, "I have so many women I don't know what to do with them". All the people in the huge room laughed after I said this.
 
General Notes
Characteristics of the atmosphere at the festivities: firecrackers, heterosexual sex, sports, music, 4th of July type stuff, lots of people, Americanism, patriotism, national pride, a sense of how the US is built on British ancestry people having heterosexual sex, people enjoying themselves as opposed to pretending to enjoy themselves, carnival-like.  








Friday
12/18
approx
730 PM-945 PM 
Waltham Y
RWRWR
0.27 W
Untimed
untimed
0
0
0
16
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 0 lbs on my limbs, and 16 lbs on on the torso,  on a Startrac treadmill at the Y.
 
Today as I was on a treadmill, I did not follow the usual practice of running the last quarter miles of the run miles first with long strides, then especially fast, and then with fanatically long strides.
 
The first mile on the treadmill, I ran nonstop at 3.5 mph in 17:00, quickstart manual settings, no inputting of my personal body weight, no incline.
 
Then without breaking I walked the second mile, on the same treadmill, in 20:41 at speeds varying between 2 and 3.1 mph.  
 
After the first two miles I took a break for 15 minutes to go to the bathroom. About 4.5 hours before start of workout I had Brazilian beef stew and Brazilian rice from the hot foods bar at Whole Foods; then about half an hour before the start of the workout a cup of coffee and a glass of 'freshly squeezed' tangerine juice.  
 
The third mile, I ran in 17:00 at 3.5 mph. The fourth mile I walked at 2.0-3.3 mph, in 22:58. I then took a six minute bathroom break. Then I ran the 5th mile in 16:29 at 3.6 mph. I finished up walking 0.27 miles at 2-3.5 mph.
 
Today instead of attempting to estimate how long my paces are being looking at my feet while running and then measuring, I counted the number of paces taken to complete a mile. The third run mile I used 80.5 six pace cycles per 440 yards. The fifth run mile I used 79.25 six pace cycles per 440 yards. Comparing this to figures for paces used on outdoors runs, you can see how the treadmill forces short choppy steps.
 
Towards the end of the fifth mile, which was run not walked, my heart rate was at 144 beats per minute.
 
Before today's run/walk, I took a little nap. I had a dream in which I was running on some weird course that was colored all in light green and light yellow and that was sort of pretzel shaped, something like a figure 8. The weird shape of the course made it hard to keep track of how many miles I had run. My mind was working really hard to keep track of how many miles I had run.
 
After the run when I fell asleep at night, I had a dream in which I was outdoors on a sunny day warm day, squatting in a green filed next to a shallow brown ditch about 1.5 feet wide and about 1 foot deep. I called up my boyhood friend Michael Gross MD on a cell phone. I told him how great it felt to be in shape.






Monday
12/21
approx
720 PM-945 PM 
Waltham Y
 
 
 
 

RWRWR
0.5 W;
Untimed
untimed
0.25
0.50
1.0
00
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 3.5 lbs on my limbs, and 0 lbs on on the torso,  on a 'Startrac Pro' treadmill at the Y.
 
Today as I was on a treadmill not on ground, I did not follow the usual practice of running the last quarter miles of the run miles first with long strides, then especially fast, and then with fanatically long strides.
 
The first mile on the treadmill, I ran nonstop at 3.7 mph (16:13 mile), quickstart manual settings, no inputting of my personal body weight, no incline.  I ran this mile nonstop despite pain in the arches of both feet. I used 80.6 six-pace cycles during this run (1935 paces).
 
The second mile I walked at 2.0-3.7 mph, in 20:41.
 
Next I took a 20 minute break to stretch the soles/arches of my feet, adjust/tighten the thighweights, and use the bathroom. Immediately prior to the start of the workout, I had eaten some Clam chowder and crackers.
 
Next, I ran half a mile at 3.8 mph., (15:47 per mile speed) took a 5 minute break, and then ran another half a mile at 3.8 mph. I had to take the 5 minute break due to the pain in the soles/arches of both feet. Stretching the soles/arches of the feet prior to starting this segment of the run, did not help much with this pain. The first half-mile I ran using 912 paces, 76 six-pace cycles per quarter mile.  The second half-mile I ran using 945 paces, 79 six-pace cycles per quarter mile.
 
Next, I walked the fourth mile of the workout in 30 minutes at 2 mph. The idea being that perhaps walking slowly will help with the pain in the feet.
 
Next (fifth mile of workout), I ran half a mile at 3.9 mph., (15:23 per mile speed) took a 5 minute break, and then ran another half a mile at 3.9 mph. Again, I had to take the 5 minute break due to the pain in the soles/arches of both feet; walking the preceding fourth mile at an unusually slow speed did not help much with the pain in the soles/arches of the feet.  I forgot to write down the number of paces used for the first half-mile in this segment.  The second half-mile this segment I ran using 924 paces, 77 six-pace cycles per quarter mile. My heart rate during the second half-mile this segment, was 150 beats per minute.
 
Next, I walked a half mile at 2.0 mph. Total for workout: 5.5 miles.
 
The limiting factor today was not fatigue, rather it was pain in the soles/arches of the feet that would get worse and worse the longer I ran without breaking.
 
During this workout, oin WHDH, the TV in front of me was playing this 'Sing Off' show, featuring groups like the 'Boston Beelzebubs'. The people on the show apparently felt that a name like 'Beelzebub' was cute and funny.
 
"Beelzebub is the name of a demon...In Christianity, the name Beelzebub or Beelzebul may appear as an alternate name for Lucifer, the fallen angel or else may appear to refer to the name of a lesser devil...In the Testament of Solomon, Beelzebul... claims to cause destruction through tyrants, to cause demons to be worshipped among men, to excite priests to lust, to cause jealousies in cities and murders, and to bring on war...the 17th century exorcist Sebastien Michaelis, in his Admirable History (1612), placed Beelzebub among the three most prominent fallen angels, the other two being Lucifer and Leviathan...he has also been held responsible for at least one famous case of alleged demon possession which occurred in Aix-en-Provence in 1611 involving a nun by the name of Sister Madeleine de Demandolx de la Palud..."
 
I cannot help but noting that a prominent behavioral defect amongst those in the Boston area, seems to be jealousy/envy; i.e., given a choice between person A on the one hand, who is lower in terms of beauty, intelligence, athletic achievement, & intellectual achievements compared to person B, and person B on the other hand, person A is chosen.
 






Tuesday
12/22
approx
745 PM-945 PM 
Waltham  Y
 

Wednesday 
12/23
approx
730 PM-815 PM 
Waltham  Y
12/22
RWR
1/2 W

12/23
R
1/2 W
Untimed
untimed
0.75
1.5
3.0
16
Tuesday Dec 22:
 
Adhering to the 'weighted runs schedule' presented in the Nov 21 entry, I did the six miles, first third and fifth miles run, second fourth and sixth miles walked, with 10.5 lbs on my limbs, and 16 lbs on on the torso via a wightvest,  total 26.5 lbs, on a 'Startrac Pro' treadmill at the Y.
 
Today again, as I was on a treadmill not on ground, I did not follow the usual practice of running the last quarter miles of the run miles first with long strides, then especially fast, and then with fanatically long strides.
 
Today I switched to inhale for two paces, exhale for two paces; previously on all the runs on the treadmill, I was inhaling for three paces and exhaling for three paces.
 
First I ran a half-mile at 3.5 mph, in my soccer shoes (up till now all the treadmill runs recorded on this page were done in my Adistar running shoes), using 1004 paces, 83.7 six-pace cycles per quarter mile. This resulted in pain in the arches of my feet. After a ten minute break to recover from the pain, I ran another half mile at 3.5 mph, again in my soccer shoes, using 1008 paces, 84 six-pace cycles per quarter mile; this again resulted in pain in the arches of the feet.
 
Next I walked a mile at 2.0 mph; followed be  an 18 minute break for applying hydrocortisone cream to my inner thighs, changing from soccer shoes to the Adistar Control 5 running shoes, and using the bathroom.
 
Next, I ran a half-mile in my Adistar running shoes, using 988 paces, 82.3 six-pace cycles per quarter mile. Towards the end of this half-mile, my heart rate was 140 beats per minute. This half mile, after changing from the soccer shoes to the running shoes, the pain was a little less and the recovery from the pain a little quicker. After a ten minute break, I ran another half-mile, using 988 paces, 82.3 six-pace cycles per quarter mile. Towards the end of this half-mile, my heart rate was 143 beats per minute. Again, the pain in the arches of the feet was a little better than with the soccer shoes.
 
Next, I walked a half a mile at 2.0 mph.
 

Wednesday, Dec 23
 
This run-walk segment was done approx 45 minutes after I ended a 90 minute segment involving running while juggling the soccer ball, which was done while wearing 10.5 lbs on my limbs and 0 lbs on the torso with the weightvest (http://www.angelfire.com/ma/vincemoon/soccairfourteen.htm).
 
The running was again done with 10.5 lbs on my limbs and 16 lbs in the weightvest on my torso.
 
Again, my breathing pattern was: inhale for two paces, exhale for two paces.
 
First I ran a half-mile at 3.5 mph, in my Adistar running shoes, using 1000 paces, 83.3 six-pace cycles per quarter mileThis again resulted in pain in the arches of my feet; however I noted that the pain was less in the arch of my right foot, and that the ankle weight on my right foot was loose and that the shoelaces on my right foot had been tied more loosely compared to my left foot. Towards the end of this half-mile, my heart rate was 147 beats per minute.  
 
After a ten minute break to recover from the pain, I ran another half mile at 3.5 mph, again in my Adistar running shoes, using 1004 paces, 83.7 six-pace cycles per quarter mile; towards the end of this half-mile my heart rate was 150 beats per minute. This half-mile as usual resulted in pain in the arches of my feet; however the pain was not as severe compared to the previous half-mile; I estimate because I had tied both shoes loosely (though ankleweights on both ankles were tight).
 
Next, after only about a minute break taking notes, I walked a half mile at 2.0 mph. I've read that it is significant, how fast one's heart rate slows down after intense exercise (the faster the heart rate slows down, the healthier one is supposed to be). Halfway through this half-mile, at 0.25 miles, my heart rate was down to 120 beats per minute. Towards the end of this half-mile, my heart rate was down to 118 beats per minute.
 

 
Both days at this heavy 26.5 lbs total in bodyweights, the limiting factor was not exhaustion but rather the pain in the arches of the feet.
 






































































































































































































































 
http://www.wunderground.com/history/airport/KBED/2009/8/16/MonthlyHistory.html#calendar
 
'Apparent temperature is how hot the heat-humidity combination makes it feel'
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wheat3.htm
Approx speaking, at 50% humidity apparent temp is same as actual temp; for every 10% change up or down from this, apparent temp goes up or down 2 degrees. As temp increases, the level of humidity at which the apparent temp is the same as the actual temp, declines.
 
@2009 David Virgil Hobbs